Flipside Movie Emporium Forum Index Flipside Movie Emporium
Discussion Forums Locked & Archived for Browsing
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Screening Log 2005 - What did you watch this week?
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 28, 29, 30 ... 44, 45, 46  Next
 
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Flipside Movie Emporium Forum Index -> Movie Talk
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Michael Scrutchin
Studio President


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 832
Location: Pearland, TX

PostPosted: 08.13.2005 7:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the night watchman wrote:
I almost envy your experiencing these for the first time. The Fog and Prince of Darkness are good, They Live is a hoot, but my two favorites from the 80s, right below The Thing, which is my favorite Carpenter, are Escape from New York and Big Trouble in Little China. Do yourself a favor, though, and just pretend that there's no such movie as Memoirs of an Invisible Man. Worst. Carpenter. Ever. Makes Escape from LA look like Escape from New York.


I saw Invisible Man at the movies when I was about 12, and I don't remember a damn thing. I do need to see Escape from New York (and LA too), but Big Trouble in Little China was one of my childhood favorites.

How do you feel about his most recent stuff -- Vampires and Ghosts of Mars? I need to see those, too.
_________________
Michael Scrutchin
Flipside Movie Emporium
www.flipsidearchive.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 08.13.2005 7:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the night watchman wrote:
Do yourself a favor, though, and just pretend that there's no such movie as Memoirs of an Invisible Man. Worst. Carpenter. Ever.


Yeah, that's pretty bad. But I might instead vote for his Village of the Damned remake.

I don't share an enthusiasm for Carpenter, and I'm sure I'm alone in thinking that Starman is his best film.
_________________
"When I was in Barcelona they showed pornography on regular television. I'm assuming it's the same way in Mexico since they also speak Spanish." - IMDb user comment
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 08.13.2005 8:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michael B. Scrutchin wrote:


How do you feel about his most recent stuff -- Vampires and Ghosts of Mars? I need to see those, too.


Both have their good points, and are an improvement over everything else he did in the 90s. Vampires has a great idea, some good scenes, and wonderfully grubby performance by James Wood, but never seems to develop beyond its concept. Ghosts of Mars is actually pretty entertaining all the way through, but, as I've said before, I thought it would have been a better movie had it starred Kurt Russell instead of Ice Cube and been titled Escape from Mars.

What did you think of In the Mouth of Madness (if you've seen it)? It's one those movies I keep watching every four or five years hoping that I'll actually like it, but never do.

beltmann wrote:
I don't share an enthusiasm for Carpenter, and I'm sure I'm alone in thinking that Starman is his best film.


I like Starman quite a bit. As far as his 80s flicks go, I'd place it above Prince of Darkness and Christine, and maybe just above The Fog, by virtue of its rewatchability.

I actually liked Village better than Memoirs, even if it is fatally flawed and doesn't hold a candle to the orignal, which is one of my favorite horror movies from that era.
_________________
"If you're talking about censorship, and what things should be shown and what things shouldn't be shown, I've said that as an artist you have no social responsibility whatsoever."

-David Cronenberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 08.13.2005 8:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the night watchman wrote:
I actually liked Village better than Memoirs, even if it is fatally flawed and doesn't hold a candle to the orignal, which is one of my favorite horror movies from that era.


I definitely agree that the original Village of the Damned is a classic--it was one of the first movies to thoroughly creep me out as a kid, and it holds up well. Sanders is marvelous in it, too.

I actually really enjoyed Sam Neill's scene-chewing in In the Mouth of Madness. The first half of the movie has some creative, engaging ideas, but eventually it loses dramatic intensity. I wouldn't call it terrible, but mediocre.
_________________
"When I was in Barcelona they showed pornography on regular television. I'm assuming it's the same way in Mexico since they also speak Spanish." - IMDb user comment
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Jim Harper
Director


Joined: 29 Feb 2004
Posts: 226
Location: Totnes, Devon, UK

PostPosted: 08.14.2005 9:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Carpenter's always been a solid favourite of mine.

His later films are often unfairly maligned, but for my money they're pretty entertaining, with the exception of Escape from Los Angeles, which is less so.

In the Mouth of Madness, Village of the Damned, Vampires and Ghosts of Mars all have extensive replay value for me. I've already sat through each one five or six times. Hell, even Body Bags is fun, especially the first segment.

The only things that have me more excited than a new Romero Dead movie are a new Carpenter movie and the prospect of Dario Argento's return to glorious, bloody form. It's getting hard to type now with all the drool clogging up the keyboard.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail MSN Messenger
Jim Harper
Director


Joined: 29 Feb 2004
Posts: 226
Location: Totnes, Devon, UK

PostPosted: 08.14.2005 9:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

beltmann wrote:
I definitely agree that the original Village of the Damned is a classic--it was one of the first movies to thoroughly creep me out as a kid, and it holds up well. Sanders is marvelous in it, too.


Can't forget the delightful Barbara Shelley. I'm even fond of the sequel, even though it's nowhere near as good as the first.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail MSN Messenger
the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 08.14.2005 10:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jim Harper wrote:
I'm even fond of the sequel, even though it's nowhere near as good as the first.


I never had much interest in the sequel primarily because the kids in it weren't the blonde haired, blued eyed ones of the first. Is this lack of continuity explained, and if not, is it worth watching, anyway?

Speaking of sequels, even if Carpenter's remake lacked something, I always thought it leant itself to an interesting sequel. Naturally, because it does, it won't get made.
_________________
"If you're talking about censorship, and what things should be shown and what things shouldn't be shown, I've said that as an artist you have no social responsibility whatsoever."

-David Cronenberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jim Harper
Director


Joined: 29 Feb 2004
Posts: 226
Location: Totnes, Devon, UK

PostPosted: 08.15.2005 8:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

the night watchman wrote:
I never had much interest in the sequel primarily because the kids in it weren't the blonde haired, blued eyed ones of the first. Is this lack of continuity explained, and if not, is it worth watching, anyway?


If I recall correctly, Children isn't a direct sequel to Village. Pretty much the only connection is the spooky, absurdly clever children, but they're a lot less alien in the sequel.

It's not a bad film; the ending is pretty ludicrous and it lacks the tension and unease of the first one, but it's still an enjoyable slab of British sci-fi.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail MSN Messenger
the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 08.15.2005 6:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, I might check it out.

Incidently, I've been looking at two box sets on DVD called Roald Dahl's Tales of the Unexpected, which was apparently a British TV series. I like Dahl's short stories and, if you're familiar with this series, I was wondering if it's worth picking up.
_________________
"If you're talking about censorship, and what things should be shown and what things shouldn't be shown, I've said that as an artist you have no social responsibility whatsoever."

-David Cronenberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jim Harper
Director


Joined: 29 Feb 2004
Posts: 226
Location: Totnes, Devon, UK

PostPosted: 08.15.2005 8:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the night watchman wrote:
Incidently, I've been looking at two box sets on DVD called Roald Dahl's Tales of the Unexpected, which was apparently a British TV series. I like Dahl's short stories and, if you're familiar with this series, I was wondering if it's worth picking up.


It's something of a classic series for anyone old enough to see them on TV. The best episodes are (as I recall them, over the mists of time) very good indeed. Most of them are 'twist in the tail'-type stories, so the entertainment value tends to depend on whether you stop the twist coming. They were usually presented as blackly comic, which worked pretty well.

The programme deteriorated in quality over the years, as the writers ran out of Dahl stories to use and started using some of their own, less inspired, efforts. Some of those early ones, from my favourite stories, were great fun: 'The Man From The South', 'Lamb to the Slaughter', 'Royal Jelly', 'Skin'- top stuff indeed.

There were some weak episodes, but the best ones have stuck with me for twenty-five years. Wink
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail MSN Messenger
the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 08.15.2005 9:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds good. I'm anxious to see "Royal Jelly," which I first read in Twilight Zone Magazine back in my teens. The final line gave me goosebumps.
_________________
"If you're talking about censorship, and what things should be shown and what things shouldn't be shown, I've said that as an artist you have no social responsibility whatsoever."

-David Cronenberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 08.16.2005 3:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote



8/1 ? 8/14

Features of the last two weeks, in preferential order:

Saraband (Bergman, Sweden 2003)

The Woodsman (Kassell, USA 2004)

My Architect: A Son?s Journey (Kahn, USA 2003)

The Children?s Hour (Wyler, USA 1961)

A Guy Named Joe (Fleming, USA 1943)

The Roaring Twenties (Walsh, USA 1939)

Looking For Fidel (Stone, USA 2004)

Persona Non Grata (Stone, USA 2003)

Criminal (Jacobs, USA 2004)

Murderball (Rubin and Shapiro, USA 2005)

Ma Saison Preferee (Techine, France 1993

The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie (Hillenburg, USA 2004)

White Noise (Sax, USA 2004)

Coach Carter (Carter, USA 2005)

A Patch of Blue (Green, USA 1965)

Lemony Snicket?s A Series of Unfortunate Events (Silberling, USA 2004)

Alien vs. Predator (Anderson, USA 2004)

Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous (Pasquin, USA 2005)

Shorts in chronological order:

Oliver Stone?s America (Kiselyak, USA 2001)

Last Year in Viet Nam (Stone, USA 1971)

La Coquille et le Clergyman (Seashell and the Clergyman) (Dulac, France 1928

Ballet Mecanique (Leger, France 1924)

Anemic Cinema (Duchamp, France 1926)

How to Tell When a Relationship Is Over In 90 Seconds (Roche, UK 2004)

More than 20 years after he announced his retirement from film directing, Ingmar Bergman has made an unexpected follow-up to his 1973 masterpiece Scenes From a Marriage, which means Saraband ought to be a priority for anyone remotely serious about movies. The best news, though, is that it's an intense, worthy sequel, with world-class performances from Liv Ullman and Erland Josephson as the divorced couple who reunite for the first time in 30 years. As always, Bergman's closeups function as scalpels, cutting deep into the characters and their veins coursing with regret, yes, but mostly bitterness, selfishness, and despair. If Fellini was the great extrovert of the movies, then Bergman is its great introvert--for my money, he's one of the four or five greatest filmmakers in history. And for those well-versed in Bergman, Saraband makes several allusions to his past work, most conspicuously The Virgin Spring and The Best Intentions (which he only scripted, but is nevertheless all Bergman). And that movie poster doesn't seem right... it makes Saraband look like one of those autumnal, stately, reverent movies made by Merchant Ivory or Eric Rohmer, rather than the bilious, cracked, fully alive psychological torture chamber that it is.

In The Woodsman, Kevin Bacon gives one of the most physical, moving performances I've ever seen in my life, suggesting a man's cavernous inner life and psychological struggle almost entirely through his eyes, lips and hands. [pasted from another thread]

The structure of My Architect is so simple, the dividends so profound. At a time when most documentaries look like dishwater?such is the legacy of digital camcorders?I especially appreciated Kahn's careful, magical compositions of the architecture.

I finally caught up with Cagney?s The Roaring Twenties, and while it's a tad moralistic for my tastes it still compares favorably to, say, Public Enemy or the original Scarface. Its theme that everyone is corruptible in times of desperation is mapped out well, and man, Bogart sure can play mean.

Ma Saison Preferee reinforced my hesitant admiration of Andre Techine, whose movies are always psychologically interesting but, for me at least, too often feel like watching people pinned under glass.

The trio of French silent shorts were part of the Anthology of Surreal Cinema, Volume 1 DVD, which also includes Clair?s Entr'Acte, which I had already seen (in a longer version, too). I had been trying to see the others?especially the Duchamp?for years. I'm also looking forward to picking up Kino's 2-disc Avant-Garde: Experimental Cinema of the 1920s and '30s.

Eric
_________________
"When I was in Barcelona they showed pornography on regular television. I'm assuming it's the same way in Mexico since they also speak Spanish." - IMDb user comment
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Danny Baldwin
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 1354
Location: San Diego, CA

PostPosted: 08.17.2005 6:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

8/1 - 8/16 (In preferential order:)

Abre Los Ojos (Amen?bar, 1999)

Se7en (Fincher, 1995)

(repeat of:) Guess Who (Sullivan, 2005)

The Skeleton Key (Softley, 2005)

Downfall (Hirschbiegel, 2005)

Born into Brothels (Briski, Kauffman; 2004)

Blade: Trinity (Goyer, 2004)

Up and Down (Hrebejk, 2005)

Fantastic Four (Story, 2005)

Stealth (Cohen, 2005)

The Evil Dead 2 (Raimi, 1981)

Maborosi (Koreeda, 1995)

The Dukes of Hazzard (Chandrasekhar, 2005)

The Evil Dead (Raimi, 1981)

Two weeks and two days of disappointments, although I found Abre Los Ojos to be amazingly effective while being totally all over the place and Se7en to be thoroughly terrifying. Not to mention, I was pleasantly surprised by how clever The Skeleton Key was. Also: believe it or not, I think Blade: Trinity was the only film in the trilogy that I could actually get into, despite Ryan Reynolds' performance and dialogue. "A mother fuckin' vampire Pomeranian? That's some fucked up shit!"

But let's get back to the negative, eh? Born Into Brothels is a relentlessely self-congratulatory "liberal-wisdom" movie with nothing to say about its subjects and everything to say about its maker. If I hear "Auntie Zana" one more time...

Downfall was also a huge let-down for me, despite some good performances and a fascinating way of connecting an entire cast--or military movement, whichever you prefer--through human reactions to inhumanity, without, of course, justifying pure evil.

I'm not sure if Up and Down just wants to be funny--sometimes it is--or some kind of pro-amnesty statement. I found half of its duel-storyline to be interesting and the other half to be cookie-cutter.

Maborosi, despite being pretentiously awful, provides me with a peculiar interest in Koreeda's films, especially Nobody Knows. The one element of this effort he handles well is his child-actor cast, which is of greater focus in his more recent work.

And, I know what you all are thinking about my ranking of the Evil Dead movies. No, it's not a mistake. The first, I find, is absolutely wretched. Not funny, cult-spirited, scary--whatever the hell it wants to be. It was the first time I've ever felt disconnected from a Bruce Campell performance. The sequel is somewhat better and substancially funnier, but I still couldn't help but think it was a waste of my time.

Jessica Simpson's ass is about all Dukes has going for it, aside from an ocassionally funny remark out of Seann William Scott. The entire third act is a chase scene. You've been warned,
_________________
Danny Baldwin

View My Reviews
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 08.17.2005 9:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Danny Baldwin wrote:
And, I know what you all are thinking about my ranking of the Evil Dead movies. No, it's not a mistake. The first, I find, is absolutely wretched. Not funny, cult-spirited, scary--whatever the hell it wants to be. It was the first time I've ever felt disconnected from a Bruce Campell performance. The sequel is somewhat better and substancially funnier, but I still couldn't help but think it was a waste of my time.


I'm not a huge fan of the Evil Dead movies either, but wretched? Man, that's harsh.
_________________
"When I was in Barcelona they showed pornography on regular television. I'm assuming it's the same way in Mexico since they also speak Spanish." - IMDb user comment
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 08.17.2005 9:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Danny Baldwin wrote:
Abre Los Ojos (Amen?bar, 1999)



I liked Abre Los Ojos, too, but it would have been better had it been American and made in English. And maybe starred somebody like, I dunno, Tom Cruise.
_________________
"When I was in Barcelona they showed pornography on regular television. I'm assuming it's the same way in Mexico since they also speak Spanish." - IMDb user comment
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Flipside Movie Emporium Forum Index -> Movie Talk All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 28, 29, 30 ... 44, 45, 46  Next
Page 29 of 46

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001-2007 phpBB Group