Flipside Movie Emporium Forum Index Flipside Movie Emporium
Discussion Forums Locked & Archived for Browsing
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Screening Log 2005 - What did you watch this week?
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 38, 39, 40 ... 44, 45, 46  Next
 
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Flipside Movie Emporium Forum Index -> Movie Talk
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 10.28.2005 12:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Robots (Chris Wedge, 2005) - Much more entertaining than I would have assumed. I especially like the retro-, sometimes Picasso-esque style of some the robots. The cityscapes are amazing. Still, I couldn?t see it as much more than a diversion, and after it was over I felt I could have spent the time doing something more productive.



Doom (Andrzej Bartkowiak, 2005) - I had no illusions that Doom would be any good, but as a former Doom junky I at least expected to enjoy seeing aspects of the game translated onto the screen. Alas, Doom is less an adaptation of the game than a pretty by-the-book Sci-Fi Channel Original Aliens / The Thing Rip-Off, with a budget big enough to afford decent special effects. We get genetic mutants instead of demons (and only two varieties of ?em instead of the dozen or so beasties that populate the game), and a dreary, underlit, unchanging research facility instead of the surreal blazing landscape of Hell. The Rock continues to reveal himself as a perfectly enjoyable action star, and even dares to do something different with this role, even if it's all for naught. Doom isn't worse than this year?s The Fog or The Amityville Horror, but it is about as useless as either one.

Madman (Joe Giannone, 1982) - One howler of a slasher flick, that boasts not one but two theme songs for the killer, hammy actors (including Gaylen Ross, who clearly hadn?t had an acting lesson since Dawn of the Dead), and one of the dumbest killers in slasher history. He?s sort of a monstery version of Uncle Jesse who rawrs to himself while stalking victims. Only die-hard horror fans and 80s slasher completists need apply.

The Skull (Freddie Francis, 1965) - A ponderous and nonsensical little piece, but why do have such affection for it? Well, Peter Cushing makes most anything go down smooth, for starters. I suppose there are very few actors besides him who would give 100% to a scene that requires being menaced by a floating skull. Also, there?s a weird little bit in the middle in which Cushing is apparently arrested and taken to a room where a judge forces him to play Russian roulette. What does this have to do with the Marquee de Sade (the former owner of the titular skull) and devil worship (the reason for the skull?s continued sentience)? Haven?t the foggiest. But I like it. And I like that it?s in this movie. Maybe I just have a thing for non sequiturs.

The Fly (David Cronenberg, 1986) - After a depressing slue of disappointments, I decided to cheer myself up with a horror standard. The Fly holds up superbly, and next to The Dead Zone is probably Cronenberg?s most easily emotionally accessible movie, even in spite of the fact that (or maybe because) the hero turns into ravenous insect. Goldblum is really wonderful as the afflicted scientist, but I think I realized only for the first time what a novel addition to the formula John Getz?s character Stathis Borans is. Normally in a tale like this you have the hero/monster and the companion/witness. If there?s another character, it?s usually a villain who is eager to either destroy or exploit the monster. Though Stathis is an unapologetic prick, his feelings for Veronica are deep and genuine (if occasionally obsessive), and when the chips are down he -- to mix metaphors -- he rises heroically to the challenge. His addition to the storyline seems to flesh out the humanity of the tale.

Danny Baldwin wrote:
Goodnight and Good Luck (Clooney, 2005) - All he really has to say about the communist witch hunts is "Ah! A conservative thought of them and therefore all modern conservatives are evil!"


I haven?t seen the movie yet, but I think it?s highly probable that its inspiration is the current attempt by certain right-wing mouthpieces to try and vindicate Joseph McCarthy. While it?s come to recent light that the Soviet Union apparently posed more of a security threat during the decade than was originally assumed, it?s significant that McCarthy?s investigations weren?t able to weed out a single one of them. How?s that quote go about those who forget the past...?

I?m really looking forward to seeing Stay.
_________________
"If you're talking about censorship, and what things should be shown and what things shouldn't be shown, I've said that as an artist you have no social responsibility whatsoever."

-David Cronenberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jim Harper
Director


Joined: 29 Feb 2004
Posts: 226
Location: Totnes, Devon, UK

PostPosted: 10.29.2005 3:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

21/10/05 - 29/10/05

Ginger Snaps Back: The Beginning (dir. Grant Harvey, 2004)

Jean de Florette (dir. Claude Berri, 1986)*

Vampire Circus (dir. Robert Young, 1972)

The Ghoul (dir. Freddie Francis, 1974)

Downfall (dir. Oliver Hirschbiegel, 2004)*

Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed (dir. Terence Fisher, 1969)

Lost Souls (dir. Janusz Kaminski, 2000)

Candyman (dir. Bernard Rose, 1992)

Memories of Murder (dir. Boon Jong-ho, 2003)

The Warriors (dir. Walter Hill, 1979)

Logan?s Run (dir. Michael Anderson, 1976)

Just a slew of old favourites and it-was-on-TV stuff. Only two new ones, Jean De Florette and Downfall, both of which were excellent.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail MSN Messenger
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 10.29.2005 4:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jim Harper wrote:
Jean De Florette and Downfall, both of which were excellent.


I agree--now you've got to see Manon of the Spring!

Speaking of Downfall... last night I saw Before the Fall, a German movie about a napola, an elite prep school dedicated to turning young Aryans into Nazi leaders. It seems that many German filmmakers are currently very interested in revisiting their national past and dealing with it in unexpected, unconventional ways. This is, in my view, a step in the right direction for German cinema.
_________________
"When I was in Barcelona they showed pornography on regular television. I'm assuming it's the same way in Mexico since they also speak Spanish." - IMDb user comment
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Jim Harper
Director


Joined: 29 Feb 2004
Posts: 226
Location: Totnes, Devon, UK

PostPosted: 10.29.2005 5:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

beltmann wrote:
I agree--now you've got to see Manon of the Spring!


Or Manon Des Sources, as we cultured European refer to it.

Thanks to the stupidity of the channel, Manon Des Sources was shown three weeks ago. It didn't really affect my enjoyment of either film.

beltmann wrote:
Speaking of Downfall... last night I saw Before the Fall, a German movie about a napola, an elite prep school dedicated to turning young Aryans into Nazi leaders. It seems that many German filmmakers are currently very interested in revisiting their national past and dealing with it in unexpected, unconventional ways. This is, in my view, a step in the right direction for German cinema.


I agree.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail MSN Messenger
mfritschel
Cinematographer


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 143
Location: Port Washington, WI

PostPosted: 10.31.2005 12:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Finally, after a fun move and trying to develop a southern drawl I have had some time to watch a few movies. Here they are in preferential order.

In the Mood for Love (Kar Wai, 2001) - Excellent movie, like watching visual poetry.

A History of Violence (Cronenberg, 2005)

Land of the Dead (Romero, 2005)

Look at Me (Jaoui, 2005)

Dominion: Prequel to the Exorcist (Schrader, 2005) - It is better than the version that was released in theatres with Harlim as the director, but not significantly.

House of Wax (Serra, 2005)
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
matt header
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 623
Location: Milwaukee, WI

PostPosted: 10.31.2005 7:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In no particular order:

Rome Open City (Rosselini, 1945) A

Wheel of Time
(Herzog, 2005) A

After the Day Before
(Attila, 2005) A-

The Weeping Meadow
(Angelopoulos, 2005) B+

A World Without Thieves
(Feng, 2005) B

Darwin's Nightmare
(Sauper, 2005) B

The Overture
(Ittisoontorn, 2005) C-

Alexandra's Project
(de Heer, 2005) C

The Last Horror Movie
(Richards, 2005) C-

Popaganda: The Art and Crimes of Ron English
(Carvajal, 2005) C+

Cronicas
(Cordero, 2005) B

Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch's War on Journalism
(Greenwald, 2004) C-

Uncovered: The War On Iraq
(Greenwald, 2003) D-

Almost all of these were at the 3rd Annual Milwaukee International Film Festival. Herzog's Wheel of Time is the best thing I saw there, and one of the greatest movies of the last five years. Many of his films are about the attempt to understand life through art--Timothy Treadwell's self-filmed exile in Alaska in Grizzly Man, the obsessed opera lover's quest into the Amazon in Fitzcarraldo, his Klaus Kinski documentary My Best Fiend--so a topic as spiritual as religion unsurprisingly suits him well. His camera is observant and patient; he rarely narrates and hardly ever supplies an editorial comment, making this an overwhelmingly visual meditation on, of course, meditation. It's one of the most calming movies I've ever seen, and in its refusal to explicate everything at length it subtly uncovers unspoken emotion, desires, and states of mind. The year's best film so far.

The worst film at the festival was The Overture. A Thai biography of a legendary ranad ek player, the film's musical set pieces can be invigorating but they're also obnoxiously filmed, with a restlessly stylized swooping camera and incoherent cutting. (The montages in this would give Eisenstein a headache.) It's not too much of an exaggeration to say it often reminded me of a more traditional You Got Served.

Jean-Luc Godard once said "all roads in cinema lead to Rome Open City. There's yet another thing I disagree with him on, but it is certainly a masterpiece.
_________________
"I don't like talking to people I know, but strangers I have no problem with." -- Larry David, "Curb Your Enthusiasm"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 11.01.2005 1:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

matt header wrote:
The worst film at the festival was The Overture. A Thai biography of a legendary ranad ek player, the film's musical set pieces can be invigorating but they're also obnoxiously filmed, with a restlessly stylized swooping camera and incoherent cutting. (The montages in this would give Eisenstein a headache.) It's not too much of an exaggeration to say it often reminded me of a more traditional You Got Served.


How do we know this prodigy is a gifted musician? Because the director incessantly cuts to reaction shots of stunned listeners, too impressed to not pause in their tracks. I agree that The Overture is amateurish--it was one of the least interesting pictures I saw during the week--and yet its crimes are too conventional to be considered among the festival's "worst." True, its strokes are too broad and its themes too transparent to engage mature audiences, but such strokes seem perfectly suited for children. Once I started viewing it as a kids' fable, a few virtues began to emerge--especially its clear-eyed defense of the arts, and its evocative rural imagery.

I'm a little bummed I missed Wheel of Time. It was on my short list of must-sees, but I'll catch it on video when it is released this week. Even better than Grizzly Man, eh?

Eric
_________________
"When I was in Barcelona they showed pornography on regular television. I'm assuming it's the same way in Mexico since they also speak Spanish." - IMDb user comment
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
matt header
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 623
Location: Milwaukee, WI

PostPosted: 11.02.2005 7:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I tried to enjoy The Overture as a conventional but breezy and clear fable, but I think it's too lurching and poorly paced to enjoy it for any simple charm. While I appreciated its celebration of the arts, that celebration also proves to emphasize how very un-artistic this movie is. (Also, I only saw eight or nine movies during the festival, and all of the others ranged from interesting to outstanding; "worst" of the festival isn't too strong of an insult.)

Grizzly Man and Wheel of Time represent some of the finest filmmaking in the past several years. I prefer the latter, but it only "wins" by a nose.
_________________
"I don't like talking to people I know, but strangers I have no problem with." -- Larry David, "Curb Your Enthusiasm"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 11.02.2005 1:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'd argue that The Overture's simplistic iconography and familiar conventions perfectly match its main argument, which is that art matters is because it sustains traditions and is rooted in familiar cultural conventions. Still, I agree that it relies exclusively on the basest of narrative traditions, and feels like it was edited with a battle-axe.

Besides Filmic Achievement, my least favorite picture of the festival was Days of Santiago, which rips off Taxi Driver with even less subtlety and nuance than The Overture brought to its story.

Eric
_________________
"When I was in Barcelona they showed pornography on regular television. I'm assuming it's the same way in Mexico since they also speak Spanish." - IMDb user comment
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
matt header
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 623
Location: Milwaukee, WI

PostPosted: 11.02.2005 11:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think we generally agree on The Overture, but there's a difference between artistic traditions and witless cliche.
_________________
"I don't like talking to people I know, but strangers I have no problem with." -- Larry David, "Curb Your Enthusiasm"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 11.03.2005 12:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

matt header wrote:
I think we generally agree on The Overture, but there's a difference between artistic traditions and witless cliche.


But in mainstream popular culture, the witless cliche is a beloved tradition! When they do the American remake, can't you just see Ben Stiller in the ranard-off?

We definitely agree about the film... you went with a C-; I'd probably go with a C or C+.
_________________
"When I was in Barcelona they showed pornography on regular television. I'm assuming it's the same way in Mexico since they also speak Spanish." - IMDb user comment
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Michael Scrutchin
Studio President


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 832
Location: Pearland, TX

PostPosted: 11.03.2005 3:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oct. 25 to Oct. 31, 2005.

House of Wax (Collet-Serra, 2005) B-

More reminiscent of 1979's ?ber-creepy Tourist Trap than the 1953 Vincent Price chiller of which it's supposedly a remake, House of Wax is a slick, fun, and surprisingly grisly slasher film. Sure, the screenplay is predictable and stupid, having characters do incredibly dumb things simply because it's time for another kill, but director Jaume Collet-Serra is a fairly skillful craftsman, generating tension and suspense from the most clich?d horror-movie situations. And, yes, the gory violence is pretty brutal. A nasty head-bashing near the end even brought to mind a similar scene in Gaspar No?'s Irreversible -- OK, maybe not that brutal, but still. The production design is impressive, especially in the strangely beautiful climactic spectacle of the House of Wax (like, literally) melting to the ground as our heroes engage in a final life-or-death struggle with the bad guys inside. Not bad for a soulless product of the Hollywood Remake Machine.

Melinda and Melinda (Allen, 2005) C+

Entertaining, sure, but this is Woody on autopilot. I still have high hopes for Match Point.

Batman Begins (Nolan, 2005) A-

Demons (L. Bava, 1985) B-

I kept waiting for the first demon-chick to say, "I'm Rick James, bitch!"
_________________
Michael Scrutchin
Flipside Movie Emporium
www.flipsidearchive.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
matt header
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 623
Location: Milwaukee, WI

PostPosted: 11.03.2005 6:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
When they do the American remake, can't you just see Ben Stiller in the ranard-off?


Hilarious! His opponent would be Owen Wilson, obviously.
_________________
"I don't like talking to people I know, but strangers I have no problem with." -- Larry David, "Curb Your Enthusiasm"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jim Harper
Director


Joined: 29 Feb 2004
Posts: 226
Location: Totnes, Devon, UK

PostPosted: 11.04.2005 8:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michael B. Scrutchin wrote:
Demons (L. Bava, 1985) B-

I kept waiting for the first demon-chick to say, "I'm Rick James, bitch!"


Demons 2 is even better. The makeup is more polished and the material stronger. Plus the soundtrack includes The Smiths, The Cult, Love & Rockets, Peter Murphy, Dead Can Dance and Fields of the Nephilim. Goth-tastic!

Which reminds me, this should be out soon:

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail MSN Messenger
the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 11.05.2005 1:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jim Harper wrote:


Which reminds me, this should be out soon:



Congratulations! Are you taking requests for the subject of your next book? You know what mine'll be. Very Happy
_________________
"If you're talking about censorship, and what things should be shown and what things shouldn't be shown, I've said that as an artist you have no social responsibility whatsoever."

-David Cronenberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Flipside Movie Emporium Forum Index -> Movie Talk All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 38, 39, 40 ... 44, 45, 46  Next
Page 39 of 46

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001-2007 phpBB Group