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What did you watch this week?
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the night watchman
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PostPosted: 11.04.2003 11:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

beltmann wrote:


How about you? What films inspire hatred in your soul?



Off the top of my head, The Santa Clause and Showgirls. I'm a worse person for sitting through both of those. I also have little patience for religious horror, and the final fifteen or so minutes of Signs really put me in a bad mood.

Eric, why do you loathe Escanaba in da Moonlight? I actually kinda I liked it, mainly because it threw me for a loop; it sort of begins like a rauchy comedy and ends up like gentler, kinder The Evil Dead. Plus, believe it or not, I was born in Escanaba.
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Last edited by the night watchman on 11.10.2003 11:37 pm; edited 1 time in total
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the night watchman
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PostPosted: 11.04.2003 11:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

matt header wrote:
I've never felt a hatred for a movie so passionately as I have for "Hollow Man."


LOL. I didn't actively hate Hollow Man, but I understand where you're coming from when you say, "I find everything - EVERYTHING - that is wrong with Hollywood is in that movie."
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Danny Baldwin
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PostPosted: 11.04.2003 11:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I liked Hollow Man when I saw it in sixth grade. Then, and still now, I knew/know nothing. Laughing

For me:

Freddy Got Fingered

My Boss's Daugter

Halloween 6

Jackass

Jeepers Crepers



I'll think of more later.
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Dr Giggles
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Joined: 09 Oct 2003
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PostPosted: 11.06.2003 5:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Danny Baldwin wrote:
Michael B. Scrutchin wrote:


I agree: Jason Lives and Jason Goes to Hell are the best in a pretty lousy series of films. But as dull as most of the original Friday the 13th is, the final act was pretty well done and reasonably suspenseful -- and Betsy Palmer as Mrs. Voorhees just freaks me out. That last-minute scare works, too. In the end, though, even the best entries in the Friday the 13th series make the worst entries in the Halloween and Nightmare on Elm Street sagas look good.


Damn, I hate Jason Goes to Hell with all my heart.


I dont know about that.

Ever seen Nightmare on elm st 6 A Dream Child?

I think the nightmare on elm st series was way overrated,

especially the first one. Apart from a couple of scenes,

its pretty weak. IMO number 3 is the best out of the lot.

Nightmare on elm st 5 and 6 totally fuct the series for me.

Yeah I think Jason Goes to Hell was weak too,

but I enjoyed every other movie in the series to some degree. I think 1-6 are good. Theres not a real standout in the series, but if you're a fan, thats o.k. Jason takes manhattan always makes me laugh, I think thats number 8.

They've kept they're fans happy over the years,

and I respect that.

as opposed to Halloween 3 - Season of the witch.

ha ha ha ha.

Needless to say I loved Freddy v Jason, I hope they sequel that.

P.S Fans of Friday the 13th dont wanna see a scary movie,

they wanna cheer on their fav masked villian, and watch as

he chops up some fresh victims. Thats all.

_____________________________________________________________

Movies seen:

-Basket Case

-Showgun Assasin

-Kill Bill

-Monkey shines

-Friday the 13th 6
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the night watchman
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PostPosted: 11.06.2003 3:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Dr Giggles wrote:


I think the nightmare on elm st series was way overrated,

especially the first one. Apart from a couple of scenes,

its pretty weak. IMO number 3 is the best out of the lot.

Nightmare on elm st 5 and 6 totally fuct the series for me.



Define "weak." The Elm Street movies get progressively threadbare as series wears on, it's true, and Freddy becomes the Jack Benny of horror, but at least each entry has a story. Every movie in the F13 is just a bunch of filler between gore gags. I mean, I like junk food cinema too from time to time, but you can only have so many Big Macs before you start to loose your taste for the secret sauce, ya know?
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Michael Scrutchin
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PostPosted: 11.09.2003 6:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The past ten days:



  • Home Room (Ryan, 2003) C-

  • Chaos (Nakata, 1999) C+

  • Sweet Sixteen (Loach, 2003) B+

  • Versus (Kitamura, 2000) C

  • Blood and Black Lace (Bava, 1964) B

  • Hallow's End (Keeyes, 2003) D

  • Kill, Baby... Kill! (Bava, 1966) B



Of those, I'd highly recommend Sweet Sixteen, which Eric wrote a review of a month ago. The Netflix sleeve described the film as a "heartwarming coming-of-age story." Yeah.

I'm just getting started on exploring the work of Mario Bava (finally). I saw Twitch of the Death Nerve years ago, but I barely remember it. I liked both Blood and Black Lace and Kill, Baby... Kill! Without a superb visual stylist like Bava behind the camera, though, they'd probably be unbearably dull. Anyone have any Bava recommendations? Black Sunday is one I'll definitely be checking out. What else should I see?

Home Room is pretty bad, but it's almost saved by strong performances by the lead actresses (Busy Philipps and Erika Christensen). As far as Columbine-inspired films go, the revoltingly tasteless Duck! The Carbine High Massacre has far more truth and insight (I haven't seen Zero Day or Elephant yet). Home Room's intentions are good, but it's clueless and embarrassingly hokey.

After all the hype, Versus was a big disappointment. Talk about trying way too hard to be cool.
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the night watchman
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PostPosted: 11.09.2003 6:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michael B. Scrutchin wrote:


I'm just getting started on exploring the work of Mario Bava (finally). I saw Twitch of the Death Nerve years ago, but I barely remember it. I liked both Blood and Black Lace and Kill, Baby... Kill! Without a superb visual stylist like Bava behind the camera, though, they'd probably be unbearably dull. Anyone have any Bava recommendations? Black Sunday is one I'll definitely be checking out. What else should I see?


Black Sunday's good, but my two favorites are Black Sabbath and Lisa and the Devil. I'm also quite fond of Planet of the Vampires. The only other Bava I've seen is Baron Blood, which is not very good at all, but has some points of interest and is probably worth a look-see.

By the way, when you watch Black Sunday pay attention to the first scene inside the crypt when Princess Asa is accidentally released (don't worry, no spoiler), and tell me if the hilarity that ensues is intentional or not. I can't quite decide. It plays like a sequential list of everything to not do when you're in the tomb of a witch.
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Dr Giggles
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PostPosted: 11.09.2003 10:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the night watchman wrote:
Dr Giggles wrote:


I think the nightmare on elm st series was way overrated,

especially the first one. Apart from a couple of scenes,

its pretty weak. IMO number 3 is the best out of the lot.

Nightmare on elm st 5 and 6 totally fuct the series for me.



Define "weak." The Elm Street movies get progressively threadbare as series wears on, it's true, and Freddy becomes the Jack Benny of horror, but at least each entry has a story. Every movie in the F13 is just a bunch of filler between gore gags. I mean, I like junk food cinema too from time to time, but you can only have so many Big Macs before you start to loose your taste for the secret sauce, ya know?


Unconvincing I guess. Look I respect Wes for puttin out his ideas,

and trying new things. But i just dont think alot of them worked.

I'd prefer to watch a friday the 13th than watch NOES 5 or 6,

I guess a lot of people are different. Thats the beauty of us humans.

Me, I love my junk food.

ha ha ha.
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the night watchman
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PostPosted: 11.09.2003 11:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

11/2-11/9

Horror & Desecration (Dante Tomaselli, 1999/2002) Neither of these movies show quite the promise of other low-budget first-timers, like Romero with Night of the Living Dead, Jackson with Bad Taste, Lynch with Eraserhead, or even Craven with Last House on the Left. The major problems I find are Tomaselli?s shaky pacing, tendency to overstate, and a small reliance on cliches. (In these two movies alone he has already used up all of his allotted there-someone-there/not-there cuts for the rest of his career.) On the other hand, he obviously has a non-traditional imagination and is not afraid to express it. Out of the two I think I liked Desecration slightly more. Perhaps it contains the ?emotional core? Michael found lacking in Horror. I thought Irma St. Paule as the grandmother gave a good performance, and although she and her grandson (Danny Lopes) share only one scene together, there?s a real sense of bond between the two. There was a greater sense of psychic collapse in Desecration than Horror, perhaps because the narrative centered on a single character, and I liked how the ghost of the dead nun wasted absolutely no time at all getting around to haunting. Horror has a few good surprises, and there?s one moment, late in the movie, that?s as startling as the blind-man-and-his-dog scene in Susperia and the cat-hater scene in Inferno. As you said, Michael, Horror is more interesting the second time around; there are some connections and clues that aren?t obvious the in the first viewing, and work successfully to bring the narrative together. I?m hesitant to make too many criticisms, since Tomaselli was obviously working with limited resources and time. His next movie is apparently going to use a more linear and traditional narrative. I?m very curious to see how it turns out.

Terror Train (Roger Spottiswoode, 1980) Watched this one out of obligation as a horror fan. Homework, ya know. Not the worst slasher flick in the world, and the only one to include magician David Copperfield in the cast. (Most of his tricks seem like cheats, but there is one where the camera doesn?t cut away at all that?s pretty impressive.) It also has a few nice details, especially the constant rocking of the train. Obviously this must have been filmed on a set, but the filmmakers put forth enough thought to go to the trouble of including a sense of motion, which establishes a nice foreboding atmosphere. I also liked how a competent adult character, the Conductor (Ben Johnson), was included. And Jamie Lee Curtis is still one of the best screamers. Incidentally, I?ve read many comments complaining about the picture quality. The version I watched was anamorphic and very clear.

Matrix Revolutions (Wachowski Bros., 2003) Either I watched a different movie than everyone else or had lower expectations. This struck me as clever popcorn, with dazzling visuals and more than a few surprises. I think it pretty much ties everything up, at least within the context of the world established by The Matrix. Sure, there?s some clunky dialogue, and a lot of ?you gotta just believe? pseudo-enlightened mumbo-jumbo, but nothing that exceeds the first two movies. Usually mass audiences eat up this mystical crap (I?m looking your way, Signs), and I can?t understand why they didn?t here. It was also nice to see the one rationalist (Jada Pinkett Smith) not be shot out of the water for her skepticism. Thank you, movie.

Poolhall Junkies (Gregory ?Mars? Martin, 2002) What a hoot. Sure, the plot is contrived, but it has a quick pace and snappy dialogue (provided the dialogue isn?t required to move the plot forward), and Martin is smart enough to allow the camera to linger on Chris Walken, knowing that Walken is interesting even when he doesn?t seem to be doing much. There?s also inventive shots of pool games (though this is no Color of Money), some clever hustles, and the ending rises enough above clich? to satisfy.

Eyes of the Mummy (Ernst Lubitsch, 1918) I have to confess this melodrama about a mysterious girl brought to Germany from Egypt while being menaced by an infatuated mesmerist from her homeland struck me as pretty turgid. It took me three days to watch (the movie runs just over an hour), and nothing in the storyline, performances or direction struck me as particularly worthwhile, beyond wondering how contemporary audiences responded to it. It has all the style and technique of a home movie. Maybe worth seeing for Lubitsch scholars, but otherwise, blech. I will give it credit for refusing to force a happy ending into the proceedings.
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mfritschel
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PostPosted: 11.10.2003 2:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This might have been one of the worst movie watching weeks I have ever had to experience in my life, with the Milwaukee Film Festival going on as we type, I feel ashamed to call myself a dedicated movie goer. But that aside there was one bright spot to my week and then the rest:

Rebel Without a Cause (Ray) B+ : With its Oedipal and Electra complexes running rampant, Ray dives into the dark side of the human psyche and takes a look into the relationships between teenagers and parents. I throughly enjoyed this film, and its classic look at the way that parents and teenagers are unable to connect and form meaningful conversations or relationships with one another. Also, much of what Ray discusses in this 50's classic holds ever the more true in today's society and how even though we claim as a society to have evolved and become more open minded, why are we still troubled with the same problems.

Matrix Revolutions C- The Wachowski Brothers : How to destroy a a very promissing franchise is eloquently illustrated is this movie. Although they stayed true to there heavy realiance on fantastic special effects, they seemed to get away from what made the other to poplular. One can argue that the first two were not deep philsophical treatises, like many people tried to make them out to be, they managed to constantly keep the audience guessing and allowed for a fun time and great discussion on what would happen next. This movie seamed to completely disregard the first two, form its own chain of thought and leave behind what made the first two good.

Life of David Gale D - : I don't even really feel on commenting on this movie, I had it figured out half way through. The suprise ending wasn't good, or even a surprise for that matter. Finally, the acting was horrible. Just an all around bad movie.

Italian Job (2003) D : There are well done action movies with somewhat good acting and then there are those with Marky Mark in them. I just really couldn't get into this movie, and didn't find a whole lot to like about it.
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beltmann
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PostPosted: 11.10.2003 4:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Haven't had time to post in this thread for a few weeks, and I still don't: It's nearly 11:00 and I just returned from the Milwaukee Film Festival. I've attended 11 pictures and one Q&A over the last 3 days. (Thank goodness for the speedy Grecian Deli nearby!) If all goes according to plan, I'll hit films every day through Sunday, except for Thursday (parent-teacher conferences). I'll report back later, but I'll say now that I'm having a ball.

Michael, I completely agree with your criticisms of Home Room and Versus, although I think I forgave the former more and the latter less. Versus is one of my least favorite movies of the year. I wanted to fast-forward through it.

Eric
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Mark Dujsik
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PostPosted: 11.10.2003 7:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

11/3 - 11/9

In the Cut (Campion, 2003)

The Matrix Revolutions (Wachowski and Wachowski, 2003)

A Mighty Wind (Guest, 2003)

Radio (Tollin, 2003)

Reviews of the other two are forthcoming.

EDIT: Added link to review of In the Cut and A Mighty Wind.
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the night watchman
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PostPosted: 11.10.2003 7:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting review of Radio, Mark. I haven't seen it yet, but I always feel uncomfortable when I see mentally capable actors (or, at least, presumably mentally capable actors) playing mentally challenged people. Especially if that actor is Cuba Gooding Jr, the "actingest" actor working in Hollywood today. The only two performances of the afflicted by the non-afflicted that didn't make me sink into my chair was Leonardo DiCaprio's in What's Eating Gilbert Grape, and Wu Xiang's in Shower, or at least the first two-thirds of that movie. I had a feeling when I heard the trailer for Radio using a clip from The Speech, which is always present in feel-good movies just in case the dummies in the audience don't get The Lesson, that the movie was going to be pretty much by the numbers.
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Mark Dujsik
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PostPosted: 11.10.2003 8:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the night watchman wrote:
I had a feeling when I heard the trailer for Radio using a clip from The Speech, which is always present in feel-good movies just in case the dummies in the audience don't get The Lesson, that the movie was going to be pretty much by the numbers.


By the numbers and done well, I can handle (and have before), but the entire movie's lesson is so skewered that it's offensive.
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Danny Baldwin
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PostPosted: 11.12.2003 11:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Arg...forgot to post here...

This is through monday...

The Matrix Revolutions

Love Actually

Funny Games

The Lion King
(Millionth Viewing)
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