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What did you watch this week?
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mfritschel
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Joined: 27 Jun 2003
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Location: Port Washington, WI

PostPosted: 01.27.2004 1:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Once Upon a Time in Mexcio (2003) - The great epic it was suppose to be it is not. It is definetely no The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly but Johnny Depp is great, as always, even though the plot makes no sense and has no coherence really.

Rules of the Game (1939) - There is not a director around these days that is in tune to social critique and what is going on in society as Renoir was in his day. Between this movie and The Grand Illusion I really can't think of two movies more openly critical and in tune to society evolution then him. This movie was brillant, I loved it, great New Historical work.

Open Range (2003) - This movie was good in parts and horrible in parts. The love story was just two forced and added nothing to the movie. Robert Duvall and Kevin Cosnter played well off each other, but you never really got a feel for the bad guys, and the rivarly was never really built up in true wester fashion.

Once Upon a Time in the West (1968) - It is defidently no dollars triology, but it steals greatly from all of them. Leone doesn't really do anything new hear, but repeat his success from the dollars triology.

Monster (2004) - Theron was great, I especially liked how it presented a flipside to the murder scenes. At first you felt no pity for her victims cause they were scum bags, but the last couple of guys she kills one really feels sorry for, and helps the movie from humanizing her character to much. One doesn't really feel pity for her at the end.

The Man Without a Past (2003) - And the point was? And the hype was all about? It wasn't bad and it wasn't great, I have seen two movies from Finland now and neither of them have really excited me.
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mfritschel
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PostPosted: 01.27.2004 1:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Beltman wrote:

Elephant (Van Sant, 2003). Fails as realism and as impressionism, but there?s no denying its formal beauty.


What if one viewed the movie in a type of coming age sense. As in most cases in real life, one's life goes on in a type of dream like stage until they undergo a type of growing up/coming of age. In most cases it is a specific event or occrunce that causes this. What if the movie is meant to be like an awakening for people. Going along in a dream like state until a horrific event like this occurs and really opens ones eyes. It could be viewed as our society who, for the most part, views high school and youth as a time of innoncence, an almost dream like reality, and it takes in event like this to really open peoples lives to what is actually going on.[/b]
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the night watchman
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PostPosted: 01.27.2004 3:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mfritschel wrote:
Once Upon a Time in Mexcio (2003) - The great epic it was suppose to be it is not. It is definetely no The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly but Johnny Depp is great, as always, even though the plot makes no sense and has no coherence really.


I just watched it for the second time last Thursday and had a blast. The narrative is easier to follow, once you've seen it, and it does actually make sense after a fashion, but I'm not sure that's the point -- Roderiguez's enthusiasm is absolutely infectious.

mfritschel wrote:
Open Range (2003) - This movie was good in parts and horrible in parts. The love story was just two forced and added nothing to the movie. Robert Duvall and Kevin Cosnter played well off each other, but you never really got a feel for the bad guys, and the rivarly was never really built up in true wester fashion.



One of the things I liked about this movie the most was the fact it wasn't built up in true western fashion. I don't think it suffered from any "horrible parts" at all. Plus, I understood Costner and Bening's relationship as less "love story" than what might be called "mutual interest story." I had no problem believing each would be interested in the other, based on who these two people are and how they've lived their lives up to the beginning of the story. Also, in most movies the heroes seem to go about their course of action with a sense of pre-planned certainty. But I liked how Duvall and Costner, on the other hand, spend much screen time deciding what should be done, how to do it, and preparing for it. The narrative, which spans about two days, delivers the feeling that you?re watching events blow-by-blow as they happen. We are with these people when they encounter their trouble, and we are in their heads while they decide how to deal with it.

More, Free Range takes the typical western notion that ?a man?s gotta do what a man?s gotta do,? which is meant to justify violence and elevate it to an act of nobility, and replaces it with a sense of unsavory practicality. When Costner tells Bening, ?Men are going to die today. And I?m going to kill them,? he is telling her that he understands there is no pride in taking another?s life, regardless of the situation. While he believes in what he and Duvall are about to do is ugly necessity, he understands how it might lower him in her eyes.



Even when the climactic shoot-out arrives, we are not allowed to experience any vicariously glory. The violence is loud and shocking. Men show fear, and when the bullets strike them their faces and bodies convulse with pain. We even find we are a little afraid of Costner's character as he stoically and methodically carries out the violence with an utmost sense of practicality. In the end, it worked for me because it took a familiar story and told it from an unusually human perspective, rather than ideological one.
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Danny Baldwin
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PostPosted: 01.27.2004 5:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

12/20 - 12/26

Torque (Kahn, 2003) - The primest example of masturbatory filmmaking in years. I suppose the 'laugh-at-it' factor runs high, but other than that, it's a pointless waste of time, as I expected it to be.

Cold Mountain (Minghella, 2003) - It's masterful up until Ruby comes along, but since Zellweger is so strong in the role, she saves the character from almost ruining the end we'd waited for, and allows it to be a good movie.

The Station Agent (McCarthy, 2003) - Just beautiful--beautiful in every way. I was captivated, intrigued, sorrowed, angered, and humored. Probably the most poignant work of the year.

The Cooler (Kramer, 2003) - Funny and bubbly. Great entertainment and an interesting premise.

I also revisited Raiders of the Lost Ark (Spielberg, 1981) and Finding Nemo (Stanton, 2003).

If it weren't for Torque, which, for some reason, I couldn't find it in me to miss, it would've been a perfect week.
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matt header
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PostPosted: 01.27.2004 8:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Open Range" was okay - I think I'd side more with mfritschel that I loved some of it and disliked some other parts. I also appreciate the attention it pays to setting up for the shootout, to the sort of gloom that hangs over both of them because they realize the violence they are about to enact. But it has a subtle feminist aspect that seems unrealistic; when Annette Bening runs out into the street in the middle of a shootout yelling, "Stop it! Stop it right now!," I had to laugh in ludicrous disbelief. I also think the introduction of Butler was very abrupt and not anywhere near as momentous as it should have been, especially considering the rage-filled vengeance that Costner enacts upon him.

"Once Upon a Time in the West" is one of my favorite movies of all time; I think in terms of music-like composition, film technique, creativity, and exact integration of sight and sound it far transcends any movie in the Dollars trilogy. The way that the images flow like musical notes, like a bloody opera, is astounding; this is aestheticized violence and drama at its finest. I really found it brilliant.

As for "Elephant," I prefer to look at it as realism, and I personally think it succeeds at it. It takes the issue of school violence - the elephant too large to comprehend - which has assumed a somewhat mythical status recently. It has become a philosophical token, a focus of conversation instead of a very real tragedy to be looked at from a perspective grounded in reality. I think Van Sant does an excellent job at regrounding it in reality; he doesn't attempt to philosophize about school violence because his intent seems the opposite: he tries to pull the Columbine incident and similar tragedies back into the emotional realm of the real world, and after following around these student for about an hour (before the mayhem begins) I was reminded of the very real, very intense, very depressing and disturbing sense of tragedy that's digressed in our society into scapegoating and hysteria. That, I think, was Van Sant's intent.
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beltmann
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PostPosted: 01.27.2004 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

matt header wrote:
I think Van Sant does an excellent job at regrounding it in reality; he doesn't attempt to philosophize about school violence because his intent seems the opposite: he tries to pull the Columbine incident and similar tragedies back into the emotional realm of the real world, and after following around these student for about an hour (before the mayhem begins) I was reminded of the very real, very intense, very depressing and disturbing sense of tragedy that's digressed in our society into scapegoating and hysteria. That, I think, was Van Sant's intent.


I agree that was most likely Van Sant's intent. Yet I disagree that the film functions as reality. To my eyes, the school doesn't resemble a real school, the kids don't talk like real kids, and the students' reactions to the violence don't play like real reactions. (Plus, real kids don't wear labels across their faces identifying their stereotypes?and where are all the regular, in-the-middle kids that represent the majority?) I felt I was watching not reality but a deliberate, impressionistic exercise. This is no ?document? of an event, but a specific interpretation of one.

While impressionism necessarily denies the film any sense of simple, objective reality, I would never argue that such an approach is inherently problematic. (In fact, I found this ephemeral exercise, scored by elegiac music, very beautiful, controlled, and mesmerizing.) The problem instead lies in Van Sant?s absolute refusal to push within his form. I think once an impressionistic path is chosen?once reality has been subverted?an artist has an obligation to use that style to offer a useful interpretation of something. I'm not asking for an explanation for the inexplicable; I'm merely asking Van Sant to justify the film?s existence. Van Sant first forfeits objectivity, and then adopts an anti-intellectual position to state the obvious about school violence. (Worse, he mines the impending violence for all the shock value it can muster, and catalogs all the usual culprits, from video games to bullying.) In Elephant, we have an artist who refuses to explore--which to my mind is the same thing as giving up on the role of the artist. As A.O. Scott observed, "Van Sant does not so much discover that an event like Columbine is inexplicable as proceed from the assumption that it is."

If he looks at all, Van Sant merely glances at the elephant in the room.

* * *

On a separate note, I deeply enjoyed Open Range, for all the same reasons listed by Night Watchman.

Eric
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Danny Baldwin
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PostPosted: 01.28.2004 2:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

beltmann wrote:
On a separate note, I deeply enjoyed Open Range, for all the same reasons listed by Night Watchman.


I agree, as well.
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Rob Vaux
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Joined: 23 Jan 2004
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PostPosted: 01.28.2004 4:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

beltmann wrote:
Welcome, Rob! I'm thrilled to have you among us. I do watch a lot of films, although this last week was exceptionally busy. That's the most I've done in a week since, oh, probably college and that semester I didn't have a job. Typically I see between 5-10 a week, but I recently realized that I owned about 50-60 movies that I hadn't seen--they just keep piling and I can't keep up. So I decided last week that I would dedicate a couple of weeks to making a dent. I haven't done anything except work and watch. That pace is over now, though. Back to the workhouse grind.

Incidentally, I really like Wicker Man. Some sequences dwell on the pagan routines perhaps a bit too sensationally, but it has a wonderfully claustrophobic sense of doom--you can practically feel Woodward's scolding puritanism tightening the noose around his own neck. Shattered Glass just missed my Top Ten; what are your thoughts?

I adore Lost in Translation, but we definitely differ on the Lord of the Rings series. I certainly admire Jackson's achievement, but the trilogy just doesn't capture my imagination the way something like The Son or Ararat do. I left those films exhilarated, desperate to talk about the feelings and thoughts they stirred up. (One of my cinematic highlights of 2003 wasn't a movie but the group discussion following Crimson Gold.) I left all three Rings feeling a little abused, impressed but wearied all the same.

NW, I dunno if I'm with the majority on Cars That Ate Paris. I don't think it's a particularly good film, but I was certainly interested--I think I was more taken with the idea of such a social satire than I was with Weir's actual expression of that satire. Still, when it was over I was unsure of where I stood regarding the picture, and that's always a positive, right?

Eric


Thanks Eric. I'm particularly impressed by the number of smaller and overlooked films you review. I never thought Milwaukee would have a thriving indie scene (though Minneapolis certainly does).

I actually liked the sensationalism in The Wicker Man, though they do lay it on a bit thick at times. It's almost a comedy, it's so broad? and then they pull the rug out from under you. It's real, they mean it, they're really gonna do it. I certainly don't think it would have worked nearly so well without Christopher Lee? or Woodward's pinched professionalism.

Shattered Glass just missed my list too, though I actually have some utterly subjective reasons for loving it. I went through a distrubingly similar situation at my day job, involving a former friend and roommate of mine. The issue was plagiarism, not fabrication, but all of the notes they touched on in the film were spot-on. The casual lies, the attempt to transfer blame, the inability of otherwise intelligent people to believe that this nice guy could be capable of such appalling behavior. After my first screening, I had the shakes, it was so cathartic. I didn't write a review because so much of my experience was so personal, that I'm not sure I can relate to it in any more generalized terms.

As for The Lord of the Rings, clearly there's only one way to settle this dispute. We need to lash our wrists together and engage in a pitfight to the death a la old Star Trek episodes. Is Thursday good for you? Smile
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beltmann
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PostPosted: 01.28.2004 5:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rob Vaux wrote:
As for The Lord of the Rings, clearly there's only one way to settle this dispute. We need to lash our wrists together and engage in a pitfight to the death a la old Star Trek episodes. Is Thursday good for you?


As long as I'm home in time for Will & Grace. Smile

Eric
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beltmann
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PostPosted: 01.28.2004 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rob Vaux wrote:
I never thought Milwaukee would have a thriving indie scene (though Minneapolis certainly does).


I wouldn't describe it as thriving, but there certainly are scattered, brief opportunities as long as you keep your eyes wide open. Plus Netflix helps fill in some of the gaps.

Eric
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Rob Vaux
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PostPosted: 01.28.2004 9:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the night watchman wrote:
Rob Vaux wrote:


Hi, I'm Rob. I work here. Smile


Hi Rob! Smile So, I gots'ta know: is it pronounced VOWX, or VAHX?


"VAWKS." Like "hawks."
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the night watchman
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PostPosted: 01.29.2004 5:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rob Vaux wrote:


I actually liked the sensationalism in The Wicker Man, though they do lay it on a bit thick at times. It's almost a comedy, it's so broad? and then they pull the rug out from under you. It's real, they mean it, they're really gonna do it. I certainly don't think it would have worked nearly so well without Christopher Lee? or Woodward's pinched professionalism.



Absolutely right. It's very nearly a satire; at the very least it's a flat-out wicked religious/social commentary. The sensationalism of the pagan rituals underscores Woodward's stoic repression.
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beltmann
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PostPosted: 02.02.2004 5:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

1/26 ? 2/1

Only the Strong (Lettich, 1993). Not good, but that Brazilian martial art of capoeira sure is cool!

Live and Let Die (Hamilton, UK, 1973). I?ve now seen every single Bond flick. This one surely ranks among the worst in the series, and the manner by which Yaphet Kotto is dispatched is one of the most embarrassing send-offs in cinema history?he actually inflates and pops!

Q & A (Lumet, 1990). What begins as a well-acted study of two interesting men, tough in their own ways, becomes a standard-issue police corruption film. Once the "and then" episodes start piling up, and multiple point-of-views muddy the narrative engine, the movie becomes interminable.

Grass (Mann, Canada, 1999). A war documentary. Mann provides an overview of the U.S. government's war on marijuana users, breaking down its history into eras that are easily digestible. If the approach is rather simplistic, the cumulative effect is still instructive: More than $250 billion dollars later, has the money been well-spent? Mann doesn't make a case in favor of weed--its virtues are not extolled--but certainly makes a case that drug laws have been far more detrimental to society than the drug itself. Souped-up graphics help sell the idea that such laws are motivated by politics, hysteria, greed, power, and a culture of fear.

Naked Lunch (Cronenberg, Canada, 1991). I?m normally game for this sort of thing, but I?ve never been a fan of Burroughs (nor the Beats in general), and this hallucination failed to take hold. As a metaphor for the creative process, I found it rather cursory, giving too much weight to chemical inspiration and not enough to hard work. Perhaps I just wasn?t in the mood for it, but I thought it was rather silly. I like Cronenberg, but this doesn?t compare favorably to his best work?eXistenZ, Dead Zone, The Fly, Dead Ringers, even Videodrome.

Decasia (Morrison, 2002). I wrote this for another topic: Morrison strings together clips of decaying, archived "found" film, all set to a pounding, mechanical score by Michael Gordon. I was immediately reminded of Brakhage and drip painting--the slowed-down clips are twisted into moving, abstract images, blotted by emulsion failing; the distortion flickers in front of us in the shape of balloons, sponges, bubbles, etc. At first the goal seems to be finding beauty in these dying films--the state of decay as represented by cinema, which records humans in an attempt to defer their inevitable loss to time--but it ultimately becomes an elegy for how cinema dies right along with us. Plus, if you look carefully, it appears that the clips have been organized into thematic movements, to accompany the musical symphony. I liked it immensely, although I must confess that I'm not sure I gleaned much from the last 30 minutes that I didn't get from the first 30.

Seven Years Bad Luck (Linder, 1921). Frenchman Max Linder is one of the forgotten clowns of the silent era, although some rank him favorably to Harold Lloyd, if not Chaplin or Keaton. This US feature is one of his landmarks, containing a classic bit similar to the Marx Brothers? famous (and later) mirror scene. (Incidentally, I prefer Linder?s version.) The story as a whole--Max endures "bad luck" after breaking a mirror, and uses his wits to get out of jam after jam, to win back the heart of his girlfriend--is rather episodic and formulaic, but there are comic sequences here that are original, clever, funny.

Troubles of a Grasswidower (Linder, France, 1908) / Love?s Surprises (Linder, France, 1913) / Max Takes a Picture (Nonguet, France, 1913) / Max Sets the Style (Linder, France, 1914). All shorts with Max Linder. None have the entertainment or historical value of Seven Years Bad Luck. Most are simple premises with few deviations from a master shot.

Intimacy (Ch?reau, France, 2001). Every Wednesday, a man and a woman meet for anonymous sex, until one day he follows her home and learns about her personal life--he even befriends her husband, a sadsack taxi driver. The drama is punctuated with very graphic, raw sex scenes, and while it doesn't qualify as porn, I wonder how much explicit imagery is necessary for the movie to score its points regarding intimacy, desperation, and anger. (The man, in particular, seems to have a serious grudge against women, and uses his "intimate" personal knowledge about the woman as weapons.) Kitchen-sink realism, with very few insights.

Bitter Moon (Polanski, UK, 1992). I know I didn?t like Intimacy despite its high reputation, so perhaps it?s strangely fitting that I deeply enjoyed Polanski?s widely reviled gothic melodrama. Peter Coyote is an American expatriate in Paris, who enters into a blissful, lustful relationship that sours into sado-masochistic violence, both physical and psychological. (I partially read it as a metaphor about freedom, especially in terms of Americans in relation to foreign places, but that might be a stretch.) He tells his story aboard a cruise ship, to straight-laced listener Hugh Grant, who is simultaneously appalled and fascinated. Complaints about the purple dialogue misses the point--Coyote's character is a failed writer, spinning his life into what he thinks is a cautionary fable of urgent, cosmic proportions, a tale of romantic and sexual intensity that he mistakes for passion. His overripe words are intended as comedy?aided immensely by Coyote, Polanski's humor here is as strong as anywhere?and yet we are also invited to doubt their veracity. I also think we're meant to take seriously the wounded psyches on display, and I was more than willing to oblige. Too many critics wanted to pigeonhole this picture?either as horror film or complex psychodrama, either as camp comedy or moral fable?but I didn?t want to reject any of those options: To me, the significance of this picture lies in its ability to satisfy all of those functions simultaneously. Has anyone else seen this one?

Eric
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the night watchman
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PostPosted: 02.02.2004 6:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

beltmann wrote:


Naked Lunch (Cronenberg, Canada, 1991). I?m normally game for this sort of thing, but I?ve never been a fan of Burroughs (nor the Beats in general), and this hallucination failed to take hold. As a metaphor for the creative process, I found it rather cursory, giving too much weight to chemical inspiration and not enough to hard work. Perhaps I just wasn?t in the mood for it, but I thought it was rather silly. I like Cronenberg, but this doesn?t compare favorably to his best work?eXistenZ, Dead Zone, The Fly, Dead Ringers, even Videodrome.



I got the impression that Naked Lunch views the creative process as reliant on traumatic events, guilt, and/or repression. Bill feels guilt over the ambiguity of whether the mortal shooting of his wife was accidental or unconsciously purposeful, resulting from jealousy and/or his homosexuality/pederasty. I also think this is often a very funny movie, despite its dark, sad concerns. That said, I do like the all alternate Cronenberg movies you listed more than this one.
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mfritschel
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PostPosted: 02.03.2004 12:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Capturing the Friedmans (2003) - I loved the objective look the movie took towards the case, and type of witch hunt atmosphere that seems to surround these cases. As far as a movie goes, I found it working on so many different levels. Some of the most intersting aspects for me was the way the three boys ganged up on their mother, and the different dichotomies this presented. At times you would feel sorry for the mother, and then other times you wonder why she can't stand behind her family more. The whole movie seemed to present these type of paradigms and I think that is why it worked so well. Especially, with the fact you knew what Albert Friedman was doing was disgusting and wrong, and yet one still felt pity for him. However, I never felt his character humanized to the point were I felt that he did not deserve to go to jail.

The Girl With a Pearl Earring (2004) - Rod Stewart sang how every picture tells a story, the this movie is a perfect example. It's just too bad that some stories are more interesting then others. I loved the cinematography and how the movie seemed to take on the feeling of art and paintings from the time. But I never really related to the characters, and just never got into the flow of the movie. It just didn't seem to do enough to capture my imagination.

Hidden Fortress (1958) - I loved Seven Samurai, but I just couldn't get into this one. It seemed to lack some of the humour, mysticism, and great characters that Seven Samurai presented us with. It just felt a bit shallow and empty.
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