Flipside Movie Emporium Forum Index Flipside Movie Emporium
Discussion Forums Locked & Archived for Browsing
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

What did you watch this week?
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 36, 37, 38 ... 72, 73, 74  Next
 
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Flipside Movie Emporium Forum Index -> Movie Talk
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 03.23.2004 5:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

3/15 ? 3/21/04

Only one:

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Gondry 2004). Several wonderful things: First, Jim Carrey finally gives a dramatic performance that isn?t distracting in its desire to be liked. Second, this is Charlie Kaufman?s best script to date, and a major step above the last Kaufman-Gondry collaboration. Third, Kate Winslet says ?man? with an ?80s inflection that made me giggle with joy repeatedly.

What I most enjoyed about the picture is the way it sidesteps the pitfalls most romantic comedies tumble into. This is a romantic comedy that embraces the challenges of love, and accepts them as necessary. Its balance of brutal honesty and genuine optimism makes for a surprisingly buoyant experience; Kaufman?s caustic side tells us that love hurts, but his human side concedes that love is worth the pain?in fact, suffering is intrinsic to true intimacy, a valuable piece of growing closer. I also think it?s worth nothing that two couples are not kept apart by the erasure procedure?if we assume that science represents rational thought, then we can infer that Kaufman wants to say that love cannot be conquered by logic, reason, and intellectual meddling. This is the most engrossing ode to the strength of love since Punch-Drunk Love. (Another connection to Anderson?s film: Like Sandler and Watson, I may not ever want to know the Carrey and Winslet characters in real life, but in both pictures I completely bought that these two characters, in these situations, could be hopelessly in love.)

One of Kaufman?s strongest inventions is allowing Carrey to alter his own memories while traversing his own subconscious, forcing other ?characters? to bend to his imagination and hopes. Of course, the point is to illuminate how our memories are unreliable, always skewed by subjective recollections. Using expressive visuals, perfectly integrated computer effects, and suspense tactics, Gondry and Kaufman express how memory functions as well as any artist ever has.

As Carrey works backwards from romantic devastation towards happier times, I was reminded of Memento and especially Irreversible. I?d argue that the way Kaufman uses his structural gimmick to score sophisticated emotional points is light years beyond anything Nolan or Noe achieved. While Noe?s lightweight misanthropic fable is often defended as a profound story of love and loss of innocence, Kaufman delivers the real thing. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind is Irreversible for those of us who still like other human beings.

Eric
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 03.23.2004 5:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey, I like other human beings and I like Irreversible, and I really cannot wait to see Eternal Sunshine. Sounds like it delivers on the promise of its premise and Charlie Kaufman's talent. If it's not in Podunk Central by next Friday I'm blazing to Lancaster, dammit.
_________________
"If you're talking about censorship, and what things should be shown and what things shouldn't be shown, I've said that as an artist you have no social responsibility whatsoever."

-David Cronenberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 03.23.2004 5:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

the night watchman wrote:
Hey, I like other human beings and I like Irreversible.


Yeah, I wrote that just to raise your hackles, NW. Very Happy I was only half-serious, although I do think Irreversible indeed contains elements of misanthropy. And I also think Eternal Sunshine is by leaps and bounds superior.

Eric
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 03.23.2004 4:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll probably like it better too. If only because I won't have to sit through an eight minute rape scene. Unless, of course, I'm not properly anticipating Eternal Sunshine. Wink
_________________
"If you're talking about censorship, and what things should be shown and what things shouldn't be shown, I've said that as an artist you have no social responsibility whatsoever."

-David Cronenberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
matt header
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 623
Location: Milwaukee, WI

PostPosted: 03.23.2004 5:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Man Who Fell to Earth (dir Nicolas Roeg, 1976) B+

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari
(dir Robert Wiene, 1920) A-

Back and Forth
(dir Michael Snow, 1969) B-

Der Lauf Der Dinge
(dirs Peter Fischli & David Weiss, 1987) B+

My Architect: A Son's Journey
(dir Nathaniel Kahn, 2003) C+

A Nightmare on Elm Street
(dir Wes Craven, 1984) B



Another good week. I finally saw Nightmare on Elm Street and totally dug it - nothing brilliant, but a lot more creative and spooky than Friday the 13th. Cabinet and The Man Who Fell to Earth were both awesome - German Expressionism rocks the house, and Roeg's direction in The Man Who Fell to Earth is one-of-a-kind. My Architect was severely disappointing: emotion seemed artificially tacked on while it was absent in the filmmaking, something strange for a documentary about a son trying to rediscover the memory of his lost father.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 03.23.2004 7:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

matt header wrote:
I finally saw Nightmare on Elm Street and totally dug it .


Have you seen any of the other instalments yet?
_________________
"If you're talking about censorship, and what things should be shown and what things shouldn't be shown, I've said that as an artist you have no social responsibility whatsoever."

-David Cronenberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Michael Scrutchin
Studio President


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 832
Location: Pearland, TX

PostPosted: 03.23.2004 8:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

matt header wrote:


Another good week. I finally saw Nightmare on Elm Street and totally dug it - nothing brilliant, but a lot more creative and spooky than Friday the 13th.


Regardless of whether or not you see any of the others in the series, you must see Wes Craven's New Nightmare, which is brilliant (or close to it). As for the others, I'd recommend the third, Dream Warriors, and the fourth, The Dream Master, which are imaginative and fun. The second, fifth, and sixth installments are pretty bad, but they still have an edge over most of the Friday the 13th movies.
_________________
Michael Scrutchin
Flipside Movie Emporium
www.flipsidearchive.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 03.23.2004 8:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michael B. Scrutchin wrote:
Regardless of whether or not you see any of the others in the series, you must see Wes Craven's New Nightmare, which is brilliant (or close to it).


I'll second that. The slasher genre is very low in my hierarchy of preferences, but New Nightmare is a great, surprisingly sophisticated picture.

And I agree, Matt, that while the original Nightmare is only so-so, it still blows away the original Friday, which is nearly unwatchable. I've seen home movies with more imagination, ideas, and polish.

Eric
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
The Third M?n
Studio Exec


Joined: 09 Sep 2003
Posts: 575
Location: Chasing Stef around post-war Vienna

PostPosted: 03.23.2004 8:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

All the Nightmare on Elm Street sequels, besides New Nightmare, which I rather like, blow.

Why the hell did they turn Freddy Krueger into a caricature? Oh well. I own the boxset but hate the sequels. I mean, kung-fu in the fourth one? What the hell?


Last edited by The Third M?n on 03.23.2004 8:28 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
The Third M?n
Studio Exec


Joined: 09 Sep 2003
Posts: 575
Location: Chasing Stef around post-war Vienna

PostPosted: 03.23.2004 8:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Misspost.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Fred C. Dobbs
Director


Joined: 11 Mar 2004
Posts: 201
Location: New York

PostPosted: 03.23.2004 8:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not a fan of any of the Nightmare on Elm Street films. Horror is my favorite genre, but a lot of these "type" of films: Nightmare on Elm Street, Friday the 13th, etc. don't click with me. I do think that My Bloody Valentine is a lot of fun, though. Embarassed
_________________
"Pino, fuck you, fuck your fuckin' pizza, and fuck Frank Sinatra."
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 03.23.2004 10:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree that the first movie and New Nightmare are the best in the bunch. But I'm also fond of the second, which most people hate, mainly, I think, because it doesn't fit with the rest of the series very well. Freddy is still "scary" in this movie, and the one-liners are more gruesome than slapstick.
_________________
"If you're talking about censorship, and what things should be shown and what things shouldn't be shown, I've said that as an artist you have no social responsibility whatsoever."

-David Cronenberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
matt header
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 623
Location: Milwaukee, WI

PostPosted: 03.23.2004 10:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I have not yet seen any Nightmare sequels, but I'm dying (especially now) to see New Nightmare. I've heard loads of praise regarding it. I've also only seen the first Friday the 13th movie, but I doubt I'll actively seek out any of its sequels. Oddly enough, I have seen every Halloween installment, mostly due to a marathon they had on AMC two years ago, and wasn't particularly blown away by any of them. (The first is quite spooky though.) I guess I'm not too into the slasher genre, either, although I've seen too few of them to have an honest opinion.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
The Third M?n
Studio Exec


Joined: 09 Sep 2003
Posts: 575
Location: Chasing Stef around post-war Vienna

PostPosted: 03.23.2004 10:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the night watchman wrote:
I agree that the first movie and New Nightmare are the best in the bunch. But I'm also fond of the second, which most people hate, mainly, I think, because it doesn't fit with the rest of the series very well. Freddy is still "scary" in this movie, and the one-liners are more gruesome than slapstick.


I'll have to say that it's the sequel -- apart from the sixth -- which I most enjoyed. Many people seem to loathe it, but I actually though it was okay, despite its homosexual undertones and whatnot [remember the gay bar and the whipping of the teacher?]
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 03.23.2004 11:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think the (largely unintentional) homosexual subtext of the second movie is fascinating. I've been wanting to write an essay about it, but I haven't gotten around to it.
_________________
"If you're talking about censorship, and what things should be shown and what things shouldn't be shown, I've said that as an artist you have no social responsibility whatsoever."

-David Cronenberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Flipside Movie Emporium Forum Index -> Movie Talk All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 36, 37, 38 ... 72, 73, 74  Next
Page 37 of 74

 
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001-2007 phpBB Group