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What did you watch this week?
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beltmann
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Joined: 26 Jun 2003
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Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 07.26.2004 2:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

7/19 ? 7/25/04

A good week. In preferential order:

A Man Escaped (Bresson, France 1957)

Broken Wings (Bergman, Israel 2002)

Close-Up (Kiarostami, Iran 1990)

Detained (Even and Ushpiz, Israel 2001)

Live From Shiva's Dance Floor (Linklater, USA 2003)

Little Otik (Svankmajer, Czech Republic 2000)

Buffalo Soldiers (Jordan, USA 2003)

De-Lovely (Winkler, USA 2004)

I, Robot (Proyas, USA 2004)

A Farewell to Arms (Borzage, USA 1932)

The Barbarian Invasions (Arcand, Canada 2003)

Starsky & Hutch (Phillips, USA 2004)

Fast Company (Cronenberg, Canada 1979)

The Big Bounce (Armitage, USA 2004)

The Flat (Svankmajer, Czechoslovakia 1968)

Monsieur Ibrahim (Dupeyron, France 2003)

In a Year of 13 Moons (Fassbinder, Germany 1978)

A Computeristic Fairy Tale (Hemmerling, USA 2003)

The first six are all fascinating. The spare, suffocating A Man Escaped recounts the real-life story of a French Resistance officer trying to bust out of a Gestapo prison. What?s most gripping, though, is the way Bresson equates the inmate?s quest for freedom with his internal spiritual quest. The very moving Broken Wings follows the traditional damaged-family-in-mourning emotional arc, but is engineered with an uncommon intelligence and subtlety. Eschewing narration, the documentary Detained simply show us snippets of life inside a tenement literally caught in the crosshairs of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict: The West Bank building is situated right on the border, the front patrolled by Jewish troops, the back by Palestinians. Inside, three widows try to raise a total of 11 kids, stopping occasionally to speak to the camera of their sorrows, their anger, their desire to be treated as men. Most memorable is an impromptu, surreal snowball battle between Muslim kids and Israeli troops.

For the short documentary Live From Shiva?s Dance Floor, Richard Linklater follows New York performance artist Timothy "Speed" Levitch on a tour of the city. The movie's most delirious bit consists of Levitch sitting on top of a giant bull, explaining how "BS" is the universal language?and certainly the fuel of this hilarious movie?which transitions into his idea for a Twin Towers memorial: An open park populated by actual, grazing, symbolic bison. Moody, evocative, and horrifying Little Otik?like Levitch?has an unusual comic rhythm. Jan Svankmajer updates an old Czech fable about the dark side of parental instinct: A childless couple carves a play infant out of a tree stump, but soon the ?mother? is suckling the creature for real and trying to satisfy its ever-growing appetite. Before long, neighbors are vanishing?

Finally, Abbas Kiarostami?s Close-Up is one of the most bewildering meta-movies of the Nineties. Kiarostami tells the real-life story of a man who posed as famous director Mohsen Makhmalbaf, telling a family of fans that they could star in his next movie. What's fascinating is that Kiarostami not only cast the actual individuals to play themselves?including the fraud himself?but also allows actual documentary interviews and actual courtroom footage to seamlessly mingle with his staged recreations. This ontological experiment raises questions about the link between cinema and reality, identity, fame, and power. Best of all, it offers the imposter a chance to explain himself on grounds that are nearly purely asethetic rather than legal. I was mesmerized.

Oil for blood

I?d like to also add that, despite its reputation as one of Cronenberg?s worst pictures, I think Fast Company has many virtues?especially the greasy details of drag strip life, and the way motors stand in for how the human body functions and needs repair.

Eric
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HoRRoRFaN
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PostPosted: 07.26.2004 3:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

beltmann wrote:
Finally, Abbas Kiarostami?s Close-Up is one of the most bewildering meta-movies of the Nineties. Kiarostami tells the real-life story of a man who posed as famous director Mohsen Makhmalbaf, telling a family of fans that they could star in his next movie. What's fascinating is that Kiarostami not only cast the actual individuals to play themselves?including the fraud himself?but also allows actual documentary interviews and actual courtroom footage to seamlessly mingle with his staged recreations. This ontological experiment raises questions about the link between cinema and reality, identity, fame, and power. Best of all, it offers the imposter a chance to explain himself on grounds that are nearly purely asethetic rather than legal. I was mesmerized.


Eric, I enjoyed reading your comments especially these fascinating comments on CLOSE-UP, one of my favorite films of all time. If you haven't seen LIFE AND NOTHING MORE yet, I strongly recommend it; having seen mostly all of Kiarostami work (haven't been able to track down any of his earlier short films, though) and with few exceptions, I consider his films to be brilliant on their many levels. I realize that they aren't for many, though. You actually reminded me to revisit this film, as I haven't seen it quite some time now... However, the film still sticks out in my memory, it's definitely a hard film to forget. With CLOSE-UP, Kiarostami is filming an actual event, while we observe him playing the past that leads up to the event, involving the key people. I love how alive and exciting filmmaking like this is, a rare masterpiece that dares to explore endless possibilities of cinema, pondering also on the effects, envy, despair, and solitude outside of the magical world of cinema. Sabzian pretends to be Makhmalbaf and while he is wrong for this, Kiarostami understands truth and the many complexities within his actions (humanity depicted in Kiarostami's work is explored with such care and meaning), leading up to a stunning conclusion that I couldn't help but be moved by. I love this film.
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matt header
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
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Location: Milwaukee, WI

PostPosted: 07.26.2004 4:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Moody, evocative, and horrifying Little Otik?like Levitch?has an unusual comic rhythm. Jan Svankmajer updates an old Czech fable about the dark side of parental instinct: A childless couple carves a play infant out of a tree stump, but soon the ?mother? is suckling the creature for real and trying to satisfy its ever-growing appetite. Before long, neighbors are vanishing?



Little Otik is one of the few movies I've seen that manages to be simultaneously horrifying and comical. I loved it too, as well as Svankmajer's Alice.
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HoRRoRFaN
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PostPosted: 07.26.2004 4:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I need to see LITTLE OTIK asap, it seems like sumthin I'd really dig and it's been interesting me to check out for a while now...
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beltmann
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Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 07.26.2004 4:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

HoRRoRFaN wrote:
If you haven't seen LIFE AND NOTHING MORE yet, I strongly recommend it; having seen mostly all of Kiarostami work (haven't been able to track down any of his earlier short films, though) and with few exceptions, I consider his films to be brilliant on their many levels. I realize that they aren't for many, though.


I concur that Kiarostami is one of the most important filmmakers currently working. I haven't had access to most of his works--I've only seen 6 or 7, and only two in the theater--and I've been trying to get my hands on Life and Nothing More for years.

I'm glad to hear that you also like Close-Up. I think it ranks as my favorite Kiarostami so far, just ahead of Ten and The Wind Will Carry Us. What's interesting about Close-Up (as I realized in the days following my viewing) is that talking about it is even more rewarding than watching it--the conversations it inspires about what cinema can be, and do, are part of its overall value.

Eric
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beltmann
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Joined: 26 Jun 2003
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Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 07.26.2004 4:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

HoRRoRFaN wrote:
I need to see LITTLE OTIK asap, it seems like sumthin I'd really dig and it's been interesting me to check out for a while now...


I've been following Svankmajer for some time now, and I think I first read about Little Otik in Sight & Sound about three years ago. I immediately wanted to see it, but it never arrived in Milwaukee and I only recently noticed that it was finally available on DVD. With your current interest in horror film, fRp, you definitely need to add it to your queue. It's kind of like Pinocchio mixed with Dead-Alive, Little Shop of Horrors, and traditional Svankmajer animation.

Eric
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HoRRoRFaN
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PostPosted: 07.26.2004 5:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

beltmann wrote:
What's interesting about Close-Up (as I realized in the days following my viewing) is that talking about it is even more rewarding than watching it--the conversations it inspires about what cinema can be, and do, are part of its overall value.


Very true, and I'm glad to hear that you think of Kiarostami highly. As I said before in my post, I completey understand why it's hard for people to connect, but it still baffles me when people say that Kiarostami's films have no "style" whatsoever, which is just wrong IMO because, whether you like them or not, his films are unlike any other. They are like puzzles that are very carefully examined in terms of framing and composition as in their themes and meanings. The very idea that a concept so simple (THE WIND WILL CARRY US, for an example) can embody so much under its surface is amazing to me -- through Kiarostami's career, he relies on his trademark spare, minimalist aesthetic and as a result, his aim is to comment on the act of watching a film unfold, comparing cinema to our personal lives. What he's really doing is involving himself in the work, pushing the limit of what it actually means to direct. How many more filmmakers (especially current) push as far as Kiarostami does in this respect? Not many I don't think.
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HoRRoRFaN
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PostPosted: 07.26.2004 5:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

beltmann wrote:
I've been following Svankmajer for some time now, and I think I first read about Little Otik in Sight & Sound about three years ago. I immediately wanted to see it, but it never arrived in Milwaukee and I only recently noticed that it was finally available on DVD. With your current interest in horror film, fRp, you definitely need to add it to your queue. It's kind of like Pinocchio mixed with Dead-Alive, Little Shop of Horrors, and traditional Svankmajer animation.


Just added it. Smile I had no clue it was on DVD.
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Danny Baldwin
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Joined: 26 Jun 2003
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PostPosted: 07.26.2004 6:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Because all of you were so interested, and I'm severely bored, I've decided to announce that I will no longer be listening repeat viewings here. Oh, so hearthreaking, eh? Well, I will continue to catalog them in my screening log for others who have no lives, as well. (In other words, I really never want to list a repeat viewing of The Lizzie McGuire Movie Wink ).
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HoRRoRFaN
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PostPosted: 07.26.2004 8:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Danny Baldwin wrote:
Because all of you were so interested, and I'm severely bored, I've decided to announce that I will no longer be listening repeat viewings here. Oh, so hearthreaking, eh? Well, I will continue to catalog them in my screening log for others who have no lives, as well. (In other words, I really never want to list a repeat viewing of The Lizzie McGuire Movie Wink ).


I try to write extensive comments on the newest films that I see, but with repeated viewings, I am not necessarily in a rush to comment on them so I'll just list them.
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beltmann
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PostPosted: 07.26.2004 3:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Danny Baldwin wrote:
Because all of you were so interested, and I'm severely bored, I've decided to announce that I will no longer be listening repeat viewings here. Oh, so hearthreaking, eh? Well, I will continue to catalog them in my screening log for others who have no lives, as well. (In other words, I really never want to list a repeat viewing of The Lizzie McGuire Movie Wink ).


I never list repeat viewings, primarily because I don't keep track of them. I also skip other material, too. For example, I watched Curb Your Enthusiasm's entire second season on DVD over the last couple of weeks, but TV programming doesn't seem to qualify for a screening log.

Eric
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HoRRoRFaN
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PostPosted: 07.26.2004 3:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Forgot to post this yesterday:

Boy Meets Girl (Ray Brady, 1994) 58

Reminiscent of a film that Peter Greenaway would direct in the way that it was shot and like Takashi Miike's AUDITION, Ray Brady's controversial BOY MEETS GIRL is is a bold, dark, and thought-provoking depiction of a man's pysche breaking down bit by bit, damaged beyond recognition. Just when you thought you were going to watch a romantic comedy, the movie is anything but. We realize this soon into it, where we open to see a man named Devin (played with riveting conviction by Tim Poole) meets a beatiful "French" woman, Anne Marie (Margot Steinberg) in a bar. After their conversation, Anne Marie proposes that they go back to her apartment for a drink. When they arrive, she tells him to relax, as she puts on a porno, giving him a drink soon after. He gets the feeling, as many would, that he got lucky for the night, but all of his thoughts change up when he starts feeling sick all of a sudden, falling to the ground in swift unconsciousness. He wakes up to find himself in the woman's dark basement, very tightly strapped to a dentist's chair. There are scary instruments of torture that decorate the room, as well as a video camera. As anyone would, he screams and screams, tries as hard as he can to break free of his bonds, and desperately tries to reason with his captor. However, the room is soundproof, no one can hear him screaming and pleading, the straps to the chair are apparently as tight as possible, and his captor doesn't plan on letting him go. His captor, Anne Marie has no accent anymore, and her accomplice (Danielle Sanderson) plan to interrogate him with their torture, planning to capture the dehumanizing on tape, just like they have done before. Devin learns of this when they show him videos of previous victims, and it's obvious from this point on that there is no way that he is going to be set free.

Other than the filming of torturing the lead character, I don't see how this is the "English MAN BITES DOG" in any way because the film ventures into territory that is rarely explored by a filmmaker, which is what I give credit to Brady for. We almost never see a woman depicted as a serial killer, especially in 1994 when the film was shot. Even moreso, we rarely see women to be the serial killers, that have intricate plots involving the people that they torture and kill. Now, with many shocking releases in this day and age, we see more of it (such films as BAISE MOI, etc.) but it is effective in this film, for its presentation, and how we are tempted to ask questions, as the women interrogate their male captive, breaking him down more and more with every bit of mental, pyschological and psychical torture. Some may be disappointed with the lack of gore that is included. I was not sure what to expect going in, to be honest. Don't get me wrong, the film wastes none of its time in its torture, some of it is weird, ridiculous, some tame, and disturbing. Psychical torture is nowhere near as shocking as the mental and pyschological breakdown of the lead character. I don't understand why this film was banned 8 years by the BBFC -- the banning was unnecessary since BOY MEETS GIRL is simply about ideas and thoughts, not exploitation and depravity.

Possibly the most interesting aspect of BOY MEETS GIRL is the challenges in the screenplay, written by Jim Crosbie and the director. For instance, in the progression of the film, we learn that Devin isn't the most innocent person, and because of these revelations, we care less about him. This is the reason why this is different than our expectations of what a film such as this would be. In a much lesser work, the director would have wanted the viewer to sympathize with the main character from beginning to end. But the difficult film refuses that to us, as we are taught that Devin is accused and guilty of homophobia, murder, constantly being unfaithful, etc. Devin's captors are no less deranged, however. They are pyschotic, showing no emotion at all aside from the dark humor that is thrown into the dialogue from time to time, and these are almost flawless performaces when capturing the attitudes rightfully. Because it is set exclusively in one room throughout the duration (except for the beginning, of course), Brady's direction is sharp in its eye for detail. There is a moment involving one of the woman's blood, and it may be possible that she is HIV positive. On the other hand, Brady's debut feature is not without its problems. For every positive, there is a negative aspect unfortunately, holding the film back from the real visceral impact it could have had on me. Questions brought up are amusing for a while, but that does not accuse the movie itself from being very simplistic, somewhat repetitive in its 90 minutes, and I would have loved more dimension into the women, but as I understood, this was not the point and not the intention of the direction. Above all, the movie has no real suspense from the start because we have a very good feeling on how it is going to end. Based on the video that's shown to Devin and the severed head that the accomplice reveals, we know that he is going to be killed also. He's teased, freedom is dangled in front of his face, but that is part of the mind games. Apart from at least one scene, there's disappointingly no authentic suspense whatsoever. Still, thanks to superb performances, concentrated direction and the sheer terror in moral debates -- not out of the torture scenes but out of the breakdown of a corrupted, flawed character -- are worth checking BOY MEETS GIRL out for.
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Danny Baldwin
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PostPosted: 07.26.2004 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

beltmann wrote:


I never list repeat viewings, primarily because I don't keep track of them. I also skip other material, too. For example, I watched Curb Your Enthusiasm's entire second season on DVD over the last couple of weeks, but TV programming doesn't seem to qualify for a screening log.


I will also skip scenes, or not be able to finish them, as well. See, it doesn't take fullscreen not to see the whole movie. Wink
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the night watchman
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PostPosted: 07.27.2004 12:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

beltmann wrote:


I?d like to also add that, despite its reputation as one of Cronenberg?s worst pictures, I think Fast Company has many virtues?especially the greasy details of drag strip life, and the way motors stand in for how the human body functions and needs repair.



Fast Company is easily my least favorite Cronenberg, although not because it is a far departure from horror, but rather because the movie itself is too formulaic. Don't even get me started on the absolutely improbable and morally questionable conclusion. Still, it's worth seeing to watch Cronenberg develop his style, since Fast Company is more distinctly recognizable as a Cronenberg movie on a visual level than either Shivers or Rabid. Oddly, the two short films included in the Fast Company SE -- Stereo and, especially, Crimes of the Future -- which preceded his first two feature-length movies, stylistically resemble Cronenberg's later, more developed work even more. Go fig. I suppose this might suggest that Cronenberg had deliberate ideas about the composition of his movies, but perhaps found it more difficult to incorporate them while filming feature-length movies than shorts.

That said, I had a weird sense of deja vu watching Fast Company. It is certainly a product of its time, and I could easily imagine it playing in the same theater as, say, Thank God It's Friday and Rollerball. A peculiar way to get enjoyment from a movie, maybe, but there you are.
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Danny Baldwin
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PostPosted: 07.27.2004 12:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

7/20 - 7/26

Only five this week, and only one really good movie. From best to worst:

M (Lang, 1931) - Absolutely haunting, and not even Peter Lorre's dynamite work at the end is the best part. Fritz Lang's extensive use of shadows, noises, and wordplay accounts for an exteme amount of tension, and the picture is still rather scary, even though it was made an entire seventy-three years ago. Take the embraced insanity to be found in Lorre's whistling and the song the children are singing in the beginning; the tone almost seems creepier before the major eruption.

A Cinderella Story (Rosman, 2004) - The fact that it's my second favorite picture of the week is extemely sad. If you look at the other thread, all the praise I will give it is found there. Awful direction and writing, but I think Hilary Duff has the ambition, at least, to be great. How she made this become entertaining, worthy of a rental, amazes me.

The Four Feathers (Kapur, 2002) - The first half is truly spectacular in its own right, and when the disc from Netflix stopped fifty minutes in, I was bummed. Of course, I went through the trouble to watch the rest, and I must say, I shouldn't have. The conventional depiction of desparity in the end is so dull and unengaging, there's really nothing to be said for the film, by the end. Terrific work from Kate Hudson in a serious role, though.

Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen (Sugarman, 2004) - I was so bored, and this was the only thing I had in front of me, at the moment. I think Lindsay Lohan is a pretty good actress, but this movie screams "made for TV!" more than any other I can think of. It's dull and overly stupid the entire way through, using the average contrivances and actually embarrassing them. I guess the set design is colorful, though. Heh.

Catwoman (Pitof, 2004) - It's fun for oh, about a half an hour, when no Catwoman is involved. I'm not sure there's anyone to root for after Patience Phillips turns into the half-feline (I don't think I could even sympathize for the human side of her personality). For awhile, its corniness works, but as it plays, it becomes increasingly indifferent and cold towards viewers. In fact, by the end, it gets to be pretty painful (to the extent in which, if I were a standard moviegoer, I may have walked out). Another showy showcase of special effects with nothing to show.

I'll be watching a greater amount in the following week, but I need to allow the film-devoted area of my immune system to recover from this week. Take the greatness of M out of the equation and I think I might've considered suicide. Had A Cinderella Story not been as pleasant as it was, I can assure you, I'd be dead. Heck, you know there is something wrong with you when you don't even want to watch Psycho for the eighth time tonight, rather than "Joe Schmo" and "Who Wants to Marry My Dad?" Oh well. Next week will be better, in movies. Or at least I hope. My dad will be back from vacation, so I'll be able to see The Bourne Supremacy. That should be fun.
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