Flipside Movie Emporium Forum Index Flipside Movie Emporium
Discussion Forums Locked & Archived for Browsing
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Screening Log 2007
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
 
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Flipside Movie Emporium Forum Index -> Movie Talk
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 01.01.2007 11:26 pm    Post subject: Screening Log 2007 Reply with quote

Happy New Year, fellow Flipsiders!



I hope the first movie I see in 2007 is Old Joy, Deliver Us From Evil, or Pan's Labryinth. But I'd settle for Letters From Iwo Jima or even Dreamgirls.
_________________
"When I was in Barcelona they showed pornography on regular television. I'm assuming it's the same way in Mexico since they also speak Spanish." - IMDb user comment
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Danny Baldwin
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 1354
Location: San Diego, CA

PostPosted: 01.01.2007 11:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Let's hope that this thread becomes as active as it once was, in the coming year.



Once I finish up the college application frenzy that has been driving me wild for the past few weeks, I think I'll finally find the time to post more on here, hopefully as much as I used to.



In the next month, I'm most excited for Pan's Labyrinth and Letters from Iwo Jima; I'm also interested in catching up with The Good Shepherd, The Painted Veil, The Curse of the Golden Flower, The Good German, Apocalypto, and Happy Feet.



Down the line in 2007, the only picture yet to really spur my interest is There Will Be Blood.
_________________
Danny Baldwin

View My Reviews
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
Michael Scrutchin
Studio President


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 832
Location: Pearland, TX

PostPosted: 01.02.2007 5:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm really, truly gonna try to keep up with this thread this year.



I haven't been to a movie theater in ages, but this month I'll try to make it out to see Pan's Labyrinth at least. Aside from wider releases of late-'06 awards pics, January and February looks like a wasteland of throwaways, as usual, but I'm interested in Black Snake Moan. That's about it. Later 2007 releases I'm looking forward to: Rodriguez/Tarantino's Grindhouse, Wong Kar-Wai's My Blueberry Nights, Michael Haneke's remake of Funny Games, and, of course, Paul Thomas Anderson's There Will Be Blood.
_________________
Michael Scrutchin
Flipside Movie Emporium
www.flipsidearchive.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Danny Baldwin
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 1354
Location: San Diego, CA

PostPosted: 01.06.2007 10:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

12/28/06 - 1/6/2007



Children of Men (Cuaron, 2006)

Apocalypto (Gibson, 2006)

Pepi, Luci, Bom (Almodovar, 1980)



Children of Men is a political masterwork from Alfonso Cuaron, not only because of its grand ability to parallel of the current international climate--the governmental attitudes toward Islamic-immigrant rioting in France and the fearful humanity lying underneath the rubble in insurgent-controlled Iraq sprang instantly to my mind as I watched--but because of its ability to understand the complexities and consequences of globalism through a basic understanding of human-life. Truly exceptional.



Apocalyto is a good, old-fashioned chase movie from Mel Gibson. It's thrilling in the moment, but other than the expertly staged action, I'm not sure it left much of an impression on me. (As a side note, was anyone else bothered by the very DV-look of the framing? It seems as though Gibson was going for a documentary-like-look, but I don't think it paid off. I'm sure it was accentuated by the fact that I saw the film in Digital Projection, but I saw parts on 35mm when our theatre had it and they seemed equally out-of-place.)



I toyed with writing about Pedro Almodovar for my NYU Film Studies admissions essay--in fact, at the last hour, I'm still kind of toying with it--and hence the viewing of his first film: Pepi, Luci, Bom. Almodovar's subject-matter really hasn't changed much over the years, but his tone and ability to conceptualize a picture's thematic resonance has matured significantly. Reading articles on the film, the general consensus is that it's merely his John Waters-esque celebration of what was newfound democracy in Spain at the time. I tend to agree, but when was John Waters ever an honorable comparison? I suppose it's an all right representation of la vida Madrilena, but cheap trickery ensues all around. The film's staunches opponets call it a crude abuse of a 16mm camera, and that's fairly accurate. Not so much because I despise the cinematography, like most--I actually think some of the rolling shots brilliantly resemble an early Truffaut--but more because what's onscreen is pretty much crap.
_________________
Danny Baldwin

View My Reviews
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
Mark Dujsik
Director


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 212
Location: Chicago, IL

PostPosted: 01.08.2007 12:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

1/1 - 1/7



Arthur and the Invisibles (Besson, 2006)

Half Nelson (Fleck, 2006)

Notes on a Scandal (Eyre, 2006)

Rocky Balboa (Stallone, 2006)

Venus (Michell, 2006)



Some good stuff here. I had already seen Rocky and Notes, and they both hold up again. Notes is a fun piece of lurid melodrama, and Venus is a bit creepy and sad with a fine performance from O'Toole. Half Nelson's script is a tad scattershot. That might be the point, but it's running from points A to B to C to X with its central character don't quite flesh him out. Thankfully, Ryan Gosling is great in the role.



As for Arthur, it's aimed at kids, and the adults suffer for it. The character design is quite detailed, but the animation itself feels a little shaky.
_________________
"Film lovers are sick people."

--Fran?ois Truffaut



10 Best Films of 2006



Mark Reviews Movies
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address
Mark Dujsik
Director


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 212
Location: Chicago, IL

PostPosted: 01.08.2007 2:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Danny Baldwin wrote:
Children of Men is a political masterwork from Alfonso Cuaron, not only because of its grand ability to parallel of the current international climate--the governmental attitudes toward Islamic-immigrant rioting in France and the fearful humanity lying underneath the rubble in insurgent-controlled Iraq sprang instantly to my mind as I watched--but because of its ability to understand the complexities and consequences of globalism through a basic understanding of human-life. Truly exceptional.




Nice.



Yeah, it's impossible to watch that urban warfare sequence without thinking of Iraq. That sequence is probably the year's most brilliant--intense, gutsy, and moving-as-all-hell when the fighting stops for those minutes.



Don't forget the odd but potent connection between the Homeland Security paranoia ("Suspicious? Report it.") and the immigration issue.



I saw Children of Men in November, and it still haunts me.
_________________
"Film lovers are sick people."

--Fran?ois Truffaut



10 Best Films of 2006



Mark Reviews Movies
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address
Mark Dujsik
Director


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 212
Location: Chicago, IL

PostPosted: 01.08.2007 2:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michael Scrutchin wrote:
Aside from wider releases of late-'06 awards pics, January and February looks like a wasteland of throwaways, as usual, but I'm interested in Black Snake Moan. That's about it.




Oh, come on. Blood and Chocolate, man!



I've seen that trailer a few times now, and every time, the entire house puts up a collective groan when the title comes up.
_________________
"Film lovers are sick people."

--Fran?ois Truffaut



10 Best Films of 2006



Mark Reviews Movies
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address
mfritschel
Cinematographer


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 143
Location: Port Washington, WI

PostPosted: 01.08.2007 2:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Manerlay (Von Trier, 2005)



A Scanner Darkly (Linklater, 2006)



Both movies seemed to aim for far loftier goals then they ever really accomplished. While Manderlay tries to paint America's view of racism, Von Trier really aims a little to far to the negative and condescending. Although this view is refreshing and worthwhile to view and interpret along with its non-traditional set-up on stage, it seems a little to skewed to really make much of an impact.



Along the same lines A Scanner Darkly played too much into the weirdness of drug addiction and its afffects as Fear and Lothing in Las Vegas, and while it aims to make more of a point then Fear and Lothing did I really couldn't get over this aspect of it.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Danny Baldwin
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 1354
Location: San Diego, CA

PostPosted: 01.08.2007 3:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mark Dujsik wrote:
Yeah, it's impossible to watch that urban warfare sequence without thinking of Iraq. That sequence is probably the year's most brilliant--intense, gutsy, and moving-as-all-hell when the fighting stops for those minutes.


I think that--and I'm speaking from a sure lack of experience--Childen of Men offers likely the most accurate depiction of street-combat film has ever seen. The intensity in the scenes you mention is extravagant and the halt of fighting is made all the more tragically wonderful by *SPOILER* Owen's character's death *SPOILER*.



Mark Dujsik wrote:
Don't forget the odd but potent connection between the Homeland Security paranoia ("Suspicious? Report it.") and the immigration issue.


Agreed on the Homeland Security issue, but I'm not so sure I buy the hype on the illegal-immigration issue. A lot of the commentary that I've read views it as a direct parallel to the Mexican-American border conflict--this is furthered by the fact that Cuaron is Mexican himself--but I see much more of a comparison to the immigration issues in France than I do the United States.



What I truly found riveting about the immigration-issue in the film was Cuaron's near-empathy for the British government's actions. Through the lens of his handheld camera in the third act, we see the desparity and filth of immigrant-filled town. While the main reasons for said desparity are, in fact, the fault of the British government in its attempts to bring order to what is basically an anarchy, one almost understands its actions in context. So, in essence, the immigrants are a scapegoat, but they're a scapegoat the British government needs to keep some degree of order. Which doesn't sound too far from a near-reality to me at all.



To me, it's shocking that several conservative reviewers have dismissed the movie as having a left-wing bent, likely due to the mainstream critical consensus in its favor. However, I can't help but completely disagree, especially due to the very root of the story. (Not to dub this as a film of any political affiliation.) Isn't the premise--the lack of ability to conceive--a direct parallel to the detriments of the current lack of incentive among families to procreate in many socialist European countries?



Lastly, did anybody else find the marketing-campaign for Childen of Men slightly maddening because it revealed the fact that Kee is, in fact, pregnant? All of the reviews make mention of the breathtaking combat sequences, but ignore the amazing scene in which Kee's big belly is revealed, presumably because it was featured in the trailer. I can't even imagine how extraordinarily powerful it might've been had I not knew that it was coming.
_________________
Danny Baldwin

View My Reviews


Last edited by Danny Baldwin on 01.08.2007 3:33 am; edited 3 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
Danny Baldwin
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 1354
Location: San Diego, CA

PostPosted: 01.08.2007 3:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mfritschel wrote:
Along the same lines A Scanner Darkly played too much into the weirdness of drug addiction and its afffects as Fear and Lothing in Las Vegas, and while it aims to make more of a point then Fear and Lothing did I really couldn't get over this aspect of it.


Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas never entered my mind when I saw the thoroughly underwhelming A Scanner Darkly last July, but that's a truly interesting comparison. I'm not a big fan of either fan, but it's interesting to think about Gilliam's long-winded approach to drug-addled delusion and Linklater's more paranoia-infused vision side-by-side.
_________________
Danny Baldwin

View My Reviews
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
Danny Baldwin
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 1354
Location: San Diego, CA

PostPosted: 01.08.2007 3:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mark Dujsik wrote:
Michael Scrutchin wrote:
Aside from wider releases of late-'06 awards pics, January and February looks like a wasteland of throwaways, as usual, but I'm interested in Black Snake Moan. That's about it.




Oh, come on. Blood and Chocolate, man!



I've seen that trailer a few times now, and every time, the entire house puts up a collective groan when the title comes up.


I haven't seen the trailer, but I get a kick out of the very straight-laced IMDb synopsis: "A young teenage werewolf (Bruckner) is torn between honoring her family's secret and her love for a man (Dancy)."
_________________
Danny Baldwin

View My Reviews
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
Mark Dujsik
Director


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 212
Location: Chicago, IL

PostPosted: 01.08.2007 4:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Danny Baldwin wrote:
What I truly found riveting about the immigration-issue in the film was Cuaron's near-empathy for the British government's actions. Through the lens of his handheld camera in the third act, we see the desparity and filth of immigrant-filled town. While the main reasons for said desparity are, in fact, the fault of the British government in its attempts to bring order to what is basically an anarchy, one almost understands its actions in context. So, in essence, the immigrants are a scapegoat, but they're a scapegoat the British government needs to keep some degree of order. Which doesn't sound too far from a near-reality to me at all.




Cuar?n does an exceptional job establishing the history of his futuristic world very succinctly. That pan across the newspaper clippings is just smart, concise filmmaking. I'm assuming when you say empathy you simply mean understanding the reasoning behind the immigration laws.



Quote:
Lastly, did anybody else find the marketing-campaign for Childen of Men slightly maddening because it revealed the fact that Kee is, in fact, pregnant? All of the reviews make mention of the breathtaking combat sequences, but ignore the amazing scene in which Kee's big belly is revealed, presumably because it was featured in the trailer. I can't even imagine how extraordinarily powerful it might've been had I not knew that it was coming.




You know, I might agree, but there are so many other shocking moments in here that I didn't mind it.
_________________
"Film lovers are sick people."

--Fran?ois Truffaut



10 Best Films of 2006



Mark Reviews Movies
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address
xAndyx
Director


Joined: 28 Sep 2004
Posts: 207
Location: Platteville, WI

PostPosted: 01.08.2007 8:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I justed watched all 5 Rocky movcies for 9 hours straight. My brain is mush...but im pumped to see the new one, however bad it may be.
_________________
One day you will look behind you and you will see we three, and on that day, you will repent, and we will send you to whatever god you wish.



-The Boondock Saints
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
juhsstin
Camera Operator


Joined: 07 Jul 2003
Posts: 87

PostPosted: 01.08.2007 3:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I justed watched all 5 Rocky movcies for 9 hours straight. My brain is mush...but im pumped to see the new one, however bad it may be.




jesus! you have the same dogged unrelenting persistence as the protAGONYist himself. Laughing
_________________
Who let the dogs out?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Michael Scrutchin
Studio President


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 832
Location: Pearland, TX

PostPosted: 01.08.2007 10:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

01.01.2007 - 01.07.2007



The shorts from disc 1 of Kino's Avant-Garde: Experimental Cinema of the 1920s and '30s:

  • Le Retour ? la raison (Ray, 1923)

  • Emak-Bakia (Ray, 1926)

  • L'?toile de mer (Ray, 1928)

  • Les Myst?res du ch?teau de D? (Ray, 1929)

  • The Life and Death of 9413, a Hollywood Extra (Vorkapich/Florey, 1928)

  • M?nilmontant (Kirsanoff, 1926)

  • Brumes d'automne (Kirsanoff, 1929)

  • Lot in Sodom (Watson/Webber, 1933)

  • Rhythmus 21 (Richter, 1921)

  • Vormittagsspuk (Richter, 1928)

  • An?mic cin?ma (Duchamp, 1926)

  • Ballet m?canique (L?ger, 1924)

  • Symphonie diagonale (Eggeling, 1924)

  • Le Vampire (Painlev?, 1945)

  • The Hearts of Age (Welles/Vance, 1934)
And one feature:

  • Children of Men (Cuar?n, 2006)
Of the Avant-Garde collection, my favorites were the surreal, dreamlike Man Ray shorts, especially the sensuous and haunting L'?toile de mer, and Dimitri Kirsanoff's two films, M?nilmontant and Brumes d'automne. Has anyone else seen any of these? I'm not particularly well-versed in avant-garde cinema, but I've been meaning to explore these fringes a bit more. I wish the Avant-Garde set had more in the way of notes, context, and commentary (as it is, there are simply brief text notes on each of the films). Have any of you checked out the Image DVD collection Unseen Cinema? That's probably next on my list of avant-garde stuff to check out.



And I'm with you guys on Children of Men: it's fantastic.
_________________
Michael Scrutchin
Flipside Movie Emporium
www.flipsidearchive.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Flipside Movie Emporium Forum Index -> Movie Talk All times are GMT
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
Page 1 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001-2007 phpBB Group