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Danny Baldwin
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 1354
Location: San Diego, CA

PostPosted: 07.04.2003 5:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good. In my review, I commented on the weird cinematography and such.
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filmsRpriceless
Camera Operator


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 65

PostPosted: 07.06.2003 1:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Danny Baldwin wrote:
I recently saw The Fast Runner and can honestly say I wasn't bothered by the digital video. But in a film like Manic (which I have only seen clips from) or Tadpole it's deliberately annoying.


The Fast Runner is currently my favorite film of the decade, and it surprises me whenever people criticize it for looking ugly. I haven't seen Tadpole yet, but I liked Manic a lot (just uploaded a review for it onto my site recently) and the DV didn't annoy me in the least. In fact, there are a few scenes (I won't spoil them) where the film actually benefits from the use of DV and gives it a special quality.
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beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 07.06.2003 2:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michael B. Scrutchin wrote:
One thing I like about DV is its immediacy. Sure, it can't compete with the depth and texture of 35mm film, but film doesn't have DV's you-are-there immediacy.


I agree that one of the main advantages of DV is its sense of immediacy, of plunging us into the real. Greengrass skillfully exploited that for Bloody Sunday. However, I disagree that celluloid cannot achieve the same immediacy--as Michael said, "It's not the format, it's how it's used." When applied properly, film can provide the same sense of intimacy and you-are-there qualities.

Consider this list (all chosen from the early '60s, an era well before DV or HD, but a time when filmmakers were experimenting with form, including a sense of realism):

Shadows, Cassavetes, 1960
Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, Reisz, 1960
Cleo from 5 to 7, Varda, 1962
America, America, Kazan, 1963
A Hard Day's Night, Lester, 1964
Naked Kiss, Fuller, 1964
Woman in the Dunes, Teshigahara, 1964

Lots from Godard, including: My Life to Live, Les Carabiniers, Le Petit Soldat, and Band of Outsiders.

I'd argue that each of those titles has a sense of intimacy and immediacy that rivals anything shot on DV--and they are less distracting about it. I would also argue that, since shooting on film requires a great deal more expertise and patience than video, their achievement is more admirable, and more artistically satisfying.

Still, I'd like to reiterate that I do feel that DV and HD have a definite place.

Eric
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