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What did you watch this week?
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mfritschel
Cinematographer


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 143
Location: Port Washington, WI

PostPosted: 02.18.2004 12:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rosemary's Baby (1968) - A great film that mangaged to be scary without implicating the scare tatics of suspense and scenes that make you jump out of your seat. Much more psychological and indepth. The scariest facet for me was I knew, for the most part, what was happening to her and yet you just had to sit and watch as her life was changed.

Miracle (2004) - At first I was skeptical that it would be another Mighty Ducks, but I was very pleasantly suprised. I enjoyed how the movie did not villianize the Russians to much. Sure they were the enemy/opponent, but they were never portrayed as cheaters or cheap shot artist. Rather they were just the best team, that happen to have more talent and out play the other teams.

City of God (2003) - I agree completely with Beltman on this one. It seemed to be a movie designed for the MTV generation. A series of 1 to 2minute shorts that loosely revolve around a some what coherent plot. It evoked no feelings, and I never found myself feeling sorry for characters or their situations. I think the major flaw of the movie, was that you never really got to know a character. Unlike in Goodfellas, which the movie has drawn significant comparisons to, were the movie centered around 3 characters and 1 in particular. This movie tries to do to much and is constantly jumping from one character to another, without really drawing a coherent picture of a single character were one is left feeling some kind of emotion for the characters. Whether it be hate, sorrow, or jealousy. It wasn't a bad movie, and besides the crafty cinematography, it reall doesn't have a lot to stand on.
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beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 02.18.2004 1:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

mfritschel wrote:
Rosemary's Baby (1968) - A great film that mangaged to be scary without implicating the scare tatics of suspense and scenes that make you jump out of your seat. Much more psychological and indepth. The scariest facet for me was I knew, for the most part, what was happening to her and yet you just had to sit and watch as her life was changed.


Greatest horror movie ever made.

Eric
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matt header
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 623
Location: Milwaukee, WI

PostPosted: 02.18.2004 2:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Greatest horror movie ever made.



I actually prefer Polanski's Repulsion, but Rosemary's Baby is easily within my ten fave horror flicks.
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the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
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PostPosted: 02.18.2004 6:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

beltmann wrote:


Greatest horror movie ever made.



Alien
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The Third M?n
Studio Exec


Joined: 09 Sep 2003
Posts: 575
Location: Chasing Stef around post-war Vienna

PostPosted: 02.18.2004 10:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

beltmann wrote:


Greatest horror movie ever made.

Eric


Ah yes -- The Shining.

Lately I've seen:

The Elephant Man - 9

The 25th Hour - 8

Dekalog 6 - 9
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Rob Vaux
Grip


Joined: 23 Jan 2004
Posts: 20
Location: Los Angeles, CA

PostPosted: 02.18.2004 11:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the night watchman wrote:
Just re-read Rob's review of Monster. Capital, old man, I think you hit the nail on the head. I do, however, slightly disagree with your assessment that "Theron brings a predatory intensity to Aileen, letting her seethe with [...] barely concealed contempt for even the fundaments of morality." Or perhaps I misunderstand. It seemed to me she was striving to convince herself (and Selby) of the morality of her actions. She tries to make her victims as monstrous as she can (fixing in her mind that one of her johns is a child molester because he asks to call him "daddy"), and at one point claims that she's "right with the Lord." Did you mean that Aileen was contemptous of the hypocritical expressions of morality she saw in the society around her?


By and large. She clearly was furious at their dismissal of her, which the filmmakers emphasize by the hypocrasy of Ricci's family (and punctuated by her final tirade at the judge)

But there's also something predatory about the character. Something that no longer recognizes societal differences between right and wrong. This woman is so broken, so battered and abused and wounded by the world, that the world's rules no longer aply to her. She trying to move beyond morality because morality has stood in the way of survival ? it's a tool that others have used to keep her down. And yet it still has a hold on her, and compels her to behave in certain ways (such as refusing to kill certain johns and geniunely trying to do right by Ricci's character). I think part of her resents those links ? the guilt they cause and the compromises they force her to make ? because she knows that sooner or later they will interfere with her ability to survive. She's at war with her own humanity, which comes out, as you say, in her rationalizations and arguments.
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Rob Vaux
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Joined: 23 Jan 2004
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PostPosted: 02.18.2004 11:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

beltmann wrote:


Greatest horror movie ever made.


It's John Carpenter's The Thing and I'll have words with anyone who says otherwise. Very Happy

Rob
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beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
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Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 02.18.2004 11:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rob Vaux wrote:
beltmann wrote:


Greatest horror movie ever made.


It's John Carpenter's The Thing and I'll have words with anyone who says otherwise. Very Happy

Rob


Although I like some of Carpenter's visuals, I deeply prefer the Hawks version. Maybe I missed something, but I thought Carpenter reduced the original political allegory to a simplistic gorefest, lacking characterization, suspense, or much sense. To me, it was a rote, by-the-numbers version of Alien. (Speaking of Alien--that wouldn't rank far below Rosemary's Baby on my list. Terrific picture.)

Eric
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the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 02.18.2004 11:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rob Vaux wrote:


It's John Carpenter's The Thing and I'll have words with anyone who says otherwise. Very Happy


I'm a big fan of this one too.
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the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 02.18.2004 11:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rob Vaux wrote:


But there's also something predatory about the character. Something that no longer recognizes societal differences between right and wrong. This woman is so broken, so battered and abused and wounded by the world, that the world's rules no longer aply to her. She trying to move beyond morality because morality has stood in the way of survival ? it's a tool that others have used to keep her down. And yet it still has a hold on her, and compels her to behave in certain ways (such as refusing to kill certain johns and geniunely trying to do right by Ricci's character). I think part of her resents those links ? the guilt they cause and the compromises they force her to make ? because she knows that sooner or later they will interfere with her ability to survive. She's at war with her own humanity, which comes out, as you say, in her rationalizations and arguments.


I'm good with that.
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-David Cronenberg
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The Third M?n
Studio Exec


Joined: 09 Sep 2003
Posts: 575
Location: Chasing Stef around post-war Vienna

PostPosted: 02.19.2004 10:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

beltmann wrote:
Although I like some of Carpenter's visuals, I deeply prefer the Hawks version. Maybe I missed something, but I thought Carpenter reduced the original political allegory to a simplistic gorefest, lacking characterization, suspense, or much sense.

Eric


I found the film to be coherent. And it was not just the gore that most bewildered me but its exploration of paranoia. A great film, that's for sure.
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keyinblackman
Grip


Joined: 19 Feb 2004
Posts: 4

PostPosted: 02.19.2004 3:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

how do you delete posts?
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Ratcatcher (Lynne Ramsay) - ***.5

Blow-Up (Michelangelo Antonioni) - ***.2

City of God (Fernando Meirelles) - ***.7


Last edited by keyinblackman on 02.19.2004 3:48 pm; edited 1 time in total
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keyinblackman
Grip


Joined: 19 Feb 2004
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PostPosted: 02.19.2004 3:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Exterminating Angel

Luis Bunuel

His contempt for the rich is highly stratified in this early film by him. Darkly satirical and all around allegorical to the lack of affirmation and will in society. I mostly loved watching the gradual class status lower as they get more and more frustrated to their surroundings and must resort to barbaric tendancies. Stripped away from their social ranking, they are nothing in the room, they cannot dictate or feel a tangible superiority. Although Bunuel's disdain is transmitted to a farce proportion it also packs within it various witty and clever nuances. Although I found the film highly intriguing it's lack of distinct plot development and motive was a bit distracting. I also wished he would use more of the repitition (as well as his token surrealism) that was used in the beginning of the film. All in all, it was a funny and ambigiously mystical film.

Dr Stranglove Or How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Bomb

Stanley Kubrick

Another film that has forced my beloved "Election" down the list of best satires ever made. This film is so masterfully done, with the intricate web of events and the three parties (politicians, generals, and fighters) interweaving in and out all with an equal amount of humor and style, it's not only a great satire, it's one of the best films I've ever seen. Even when Kubrick makes a comedy he introduces art into the mix, from the ambitious and legendary war room, to the duplicate of a bomber plane all in highly defined and bold black and white that exploits all the features broadly but beautifully. A brilliant script and one actor playing three roles (very very well) this film carries some of the best jokes and historical film moments with as much gusto as it did upon it's first release. Truly a marvel of a film, that everyone should see, if not in a U.S. History class.

2001: A Space Odyssey

Stanley Kubrick

When people talk of "poetic" or "lyrical" films, they usually have no idea what they are saying ("All the Real Girls"), but if ever the words existed to serve utility to a film, it is Kubrick's "2001". The imagery hovers gracefully and goregeously in this ballet of outer space. Many feel that the film's longevity is forced profundity and pretentiousness, but I was hypnotized by the perfectly paired musical pieces and imagery, each having a hand of enhancing the other, a mutual bond of augmentation. Kubrick's use of silence for this cold, distant, and emotionally desolate space juxtaposed to the anxious frantic screamings of the apes, one can conjure the very essence of evolution. Although the birth symbolism was awfully thematically tyrranical, I admired all of it's subtleties. The cinematography has lasted the test of time, and will probably continue. If the date of this film was not remembered, I would easily take it as a film of todays standards. Beautiful sterile set designs, and the exuberant use of rich colors and espicially white (almost equated with the silence that Kubrick inspires and provoks thought with) all represent how magnificent the film looks. It's a ocular orgasm for the eyes and the ears, not once was I bored are wanderous when watching it. Although it's final ending was a bit too cryptic that didn't exactly fit the discreetness of the film for my liking, I can see why so many people love it. Although I can't truly literate my true feelings on this film, it has really changed my parameters of film. "2001: A Space Odyssey" is cinema defined to it's uptmost capability (at the time).



I'll post my thought on "City of God" later.
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Ratcatcher (Lynne Ramsay) - ***.5

Blow-Up (Michelangelo Antonioni) - ***.2

City of God (Fernando Meirelles) - ***.7
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the night watchman
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Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 02.19.2004 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

keyinblackman wrote:
The Exterminating Angel

Luis Bunuel


I haven't seen any of Bunuel's work yet, and this film, aside from Un Chien Andalou is the one I'm most looking forward to seeing.
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-David Cronenberg
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the night watchman
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Joined: 27 Jun 2003
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PostPosted: 02.19.2004 6:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

keyinblackman wrote:
how do you delete posts?


I think only a moderator or the admin can delete a post, but you can go back and edit your own to read [DELETED].
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