Flipside Movie Emporium Forum Index Flipside Movie Emporium
Discussion Forums Locked & Archived for Browsing
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

What did you watch this week?
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 61, 62, 63 ... 72, 73, 74  Next
 
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Flipside Movie Emporium Forum Index -> Movie Talk
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
mfritschel
Cinematographer


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 143
Location: Port Washington, WI

PostPosted: 09.08.2004 2:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Human Stain (Benton 2003) - thoroughly entertaing, although the ending left much to be desired, I feel as if the movie could have accomplished so much more. It presented some interesting thoughts and did a fairly good job of mapping out the culture of the late 1990's, and yet never really did anything with it. The ending felt a little forced, almost as if the film makers decided they were approaching the 2 hour mark and needed a quick fix.



Exorcist: The Beginning (Harlin 2004) - not nearly the masterpiece the original was. This version seemed to reply much more on general nominal scare tatics designed primarily to make you jump out of your seat, instead of disturb you on a psychological level. Although the original at time could be criticized for the same at times, this one seemed to have much more the feal of Nightmare on Elm Street feel, than the type of horror that the first one brought out. I am still very interested to compare it to its companion movie, the back story of this movie is almost more entertaing and provacative then the actual movie itself. That being said I, I still find myself having a lot of fun jumping out of my seat during the movie.



Broken Wings (Bergman 2004) - a great moving family piece about loss, social status, and putting one's life back together. The acting was suberb and the movie itself was very well put together. The major bonuses of the movie being its indirect social commentary on the status of signal parent famlies, and their economic situtaions, and the way one could feel that the movie could relate to any culture or any period. Although it was an all to familiar story, it still seemed fresh and moving.



Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (Lee 2003)



Collateral (Mann 2004) - When Mann is on, he is great. He has an uncanny capability to capture the dark side of Southern California, especially at night. This movie and Heat, both seemed so influenced by the culture of LA, and work so well within its perameters. But then again this could just be a yankee from Wisconsin not knowing any better.



Shattered Glass (Ray 2003) - I don't know what it is about the loser and liar, but these movies always seem to make the best stories.



Passion of Joan of Arc (Dreyer 1928) - easily of the greatest films of all time, so many memorable shots, but I would have to say my favorite is the ending sequence. The camera during that riot, and during the whole movie for that matter, was just so fantastic.



In the Mirror of Maya Deren (Kudalacek 2004) - although it seemed she lived a very interesting life, I just couldn not get into the movie, maybe its because I knew next to nothing about her work.



Jackie Brown (Tarantino 1997)



Crimson Gold (Panahi 2004) - Panahi is one of the most critical directors on society I have seen in awhile, I am amazed at how openly he attacks his society and yet the pictures really seem to relate to all states of life. The movie would have had the same effect and been just as plausible, maybe even more so, if it would have been based in the US. Yet how many US directors do we find that are as openly critical and have the ability to do so in a very artful manner, that manages to say so much about the human condition.[/i]
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Danny Baldwin
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 1354
Location: San Diego, CA

PostPosted: 09.08.2004 3:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

the night watchman wrote:
I didn't even know this had been released yet. I just saw the trailer for the first time Sunday. It caught my attention. Did you see at festival, Danny?


Nope. It has been downtown for three weeks and just came closer this weekend so I caught it.
_________________
Danny Baldwin

View My Reviews
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 09.08.2004 3:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Danny Baldwin wrote:
the night watchman wrote:
I didn't even know this had been released yet. I just saw the trailer for the first time Sunday. It caught my attention. Did you see at festival, Danny?


Nope. It has been downtown for three weeks and just came closer this weekend so I caught it.


It's been playing in Milwaukee, too. I'm hoping to catch it before it flees the city.



Eric
_________________
"When I was in Barcelona they showed pornography on regular television. I'm assuming it's the same way in Mexico since they also speak Spanish." - IMDb user comment
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Dr Giggles
Camera Operator


Joined: 09 Oct 2003
Posts: 84

PostPosted: 09.09.2004 12:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Carnival of souls (1962) Herk Harvey

A fairly creepy movie, it was an absolute pleasure watching Candace Hilligoss take most of the screen. Havent seen the "Wes craven presents" remake, dont think I want to. Anyone seen the remake?



P.S What kind of a name is Herk?



Dont Look Now (1973) Nicolas Roeg

Excellent thriller, that had me engrossed the entire time.

The location of Venice is so beautiful but yet, very isolated and very

mysterious. I'll never look at a red coat the same way.



The Shining (1997)(mini) Mick Garris

Got nothing on Kubrick.
_________________
walking on air, up from the wheelchair,

I'll find the suicide, that I deserve.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
smarty
Camera Operator


Joined: 29 Jun 2004
Posts: 79

PostPosted: 09.09.2004 2:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Outfoxed: Rupert Murdock's War on Journalism (Greenwald, 2004)



I just finished watching "Outfoxed"and I thought it was amazing. While the way it was shot was extremely underwhelming, it did an excellent job of getting its points across in a very convincing manner. Has anyone else see it?
_________________
everybody knows that you only live a day/ but its brilliant anyway


Last edited by smarty on 09.09.2004 9:15 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
The Third M?n
Studio Exec


Joined: 09 Sep 2003
Posts: 575
Location: Chasing Stef around post-war Vienna

PostPosted: 09.09.2004 5:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good Morning (1959, Ozu)



Good Morning was a splendid film. Ozu paints the film with nightmarishly bright colors, giving the film a light-hearted feel that never ceases to pervade its surface. His camera never moves -- not even once -- throughtout the whole running time, and even then the Technicolor cinematography, however passive, is incredible. Ozu shows us the lives of four families living in a tightly-knit community of blocks with admirable skill, focusing on two brothers who decide to take a vow of silence after their parents refuse to buy them a television. Good Morning (Ohayo) works as a comedy -- there are some moments with two brothers that are really funny, what with the flatulence jokes, etc --, and yet it can also be viewed in many other ways. While it's not profound or anything of the sort -- it doesn't set out to be -- Good Morning emphasizes the importance of communication between the people, satirizes subtly the people's over-dependence on materialism and works as an example of Japan's entry into the modern world. For a long time Ozu's films were unavailable in the occident because they were deemed "too Japanese", but, this being the first film of his that I've seen, I have to say that Good Morning is anything but that; it's a purely universal work. Good Morning serves as a fine introduction to Ozu's ouvre and is one of the best films I've seen in a long time. It's undeniably simple, but that doesn't mean it's simplistic.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
matt header
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 623
Location: Milwaukee, WI

PostPosted: 09.09.2004 6:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I haven't seen We Don't Live Here Anymore, but at the theatre I work at, some lady left after thirty minutes and demanded her money back because "there was adultery in it." Hmmmm....





Quote:
what?s wrong with smart and funny dialogue, even if it isn?t in the realist mode?




Nothing at all, but I didn't find the dialogue in Garden State smart or particularly funny. I normally prefer absurdity more than realism (just a personal leaning), and indeed my favorite scene in the movie is when Andrew wakes up and sees a knight silhouetted against the sun shining through the window. I didn't criticize its artificiality in the essence that they don't talk or act the way real people do; I criticized the artificiality in that Andrew and Sam's developing bond or Andrew's evolution as a character never seemed relatable or effective to me.



To me, Garden State was the definition of canned spirituality: its emphatic ruminations on how we must absorb pain and heal from it in life seemed blatantly obvious and slight at the same time. Andrew howling at "the abyss of life"? Geesh. I totally agree that it aims for humanism and certainly does like its characters, but I must say I didn't; they never transcended cute-movie-character-land, and the movie's noble attempts at humanist optimism seemed prepackaged and simply portrayed.
_________________
"I don't like talking to people I know, but strangers I have no problem with." -- Larry David, "Curb Your Enthusiasm"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 09.09.2004 8:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fair enough.
_________________
"If you're talking about censorship, and what things should be shown and what things shouldn't be shown, I've said that as an artist you have no social responsibility whatsoever."

-David Cronenberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Danny Baldwin
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 1354
Location: San Diego, CA

PostPosted: 09.09.2004 10:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

matt header wrote:
I haven't seen We Don't Live Here Anymore, but at the theatre I work at, some lady left after thirty minutes and demanded her money back because "there was adultery in it." Hmmmm....


Virgin moviegoers just ain't what they used to be.
_________________
Danny Baldwin

View My Reviews
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
matt header
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 623
Location: Milwaukee, WI

PostPosted: 09.10.2004 3:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As a quick side note, I feel like I should say I didn't hate Garden State; I had an exceptionally good week for movie-watching, and that just happened to be the least spectacular. I agree with almost everything you said, night watchman, but I don't think I felt nearly as close to the characters as you felt.
_________________
"I don't like talking to people I know, but strangers I have no problem with." -- Larry David, "Curb Your Enthusiasm"
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 09.13.2004 1:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

9/6 ? 9/12/04



In preferential order:



Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter? and Spring (Kim, South Korea 2003)

We Don?t Live Here Anymore (Curran, USA 2004)

Intimate Strangers (Leconte, France 2004)

Jim Brown: All American (Lee, USA 2002)

Kiss of Life (Young, UK 2003)

Jersey Girl (Smith, USA 2004)

The Prince & Me (Coolidge, USA 2004)

Against the Ropes (Dutton, USA 2004)



Kim?s eloquent and hypnotizing Spring? continues the recent renaissance in South Korean cinema, and I prefer it over even the recent work by Im Kwon-Taek. Although it?s a lofty movie about no less than the acquisition of wisdom over a lifetime, it is stripped of pretension, clutter, and sermonizing. Plus, I?d compare the rich cinematography to that of Tran Anh Hung, another Asian filmmaker infatuated with the gifts of color photography?both directors provide highs of pure, sensational cinema that commercial blockbusters can only fantasize about.



We Don?t Live Here Anymore captures the true rhythm of troubled, intimate relationships better than any movie I?ve seen since The Secret Lives of Dentists. As two couples circle around various layers of betrayal, the movie focuses not on adultery itself but on the subtle, bottomless character motivations that accompany indiscretion. It also boasts extraordinary performances from all four leads, and by now everyone must know that Mark Ruffalo is the closest thing to Montgomery Clift the screen has witnessed since, well, Monty himself.



Basking in the glories of speaking and hearing?and connecting listening to intimacy, fantasy, and arousal?Intimate Strangers is my favorite Leconte picture outside of The Widow of Saint-Pierre.



Since I feel he?s been on a steady decline ever since Chasing Amy, I went into Kevin Smith?s Jersey Girl with low expectations. While most of the emotional arc relies on the stalest of stale conventions?such as the father racing to appear unexpectedly at a school play, or the dilemma of having to choose between small town nobility and the ?corruption? of wealth?I must concede that I responded to Ben Affleck?s initiation into fatherhood. I must also concede that my response probably has less to do with aesthetics than with my own recent venture into parenting.



Eric
_________________
"When I was in Barcelona they showed pornography on regular television. I'm assuming it's the same way in Mexico since they also speak Spanish." - IMDb user comment
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Danny Baldwin
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 1354
Location: San Diego, CA

PostPosted: 09.14.2004 3:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

9/7 - 9/13



I'm starting to realize what they mean by "Advanced Placement" classes.



In preferential order:



Wicker Park (McGuigan, 2004)

Run Lola Run (Tykwer, 1999)

Resident Evil 2: Apocalypse (Witt, 2004)



I wasn't particularly wild about any of them. Wicker Park is quite clever and genre-defying, but it's so detached and cold in its approach, the lack of passion seems tedious. I was interested, yes, but, in the end, it didn't win me over. The same goes for Run Lola Run, which I'm in a very small opposition against. I understand that one action changes everything and have picked my favorite of the three outcomes of the story exhibited. I was also bored by everything about it and annoyed by the hyperactive style.



Resident Evil 2 was no surprise, but the few awesome scenes in the first movie, for some reason, made me want to see this one. There are some funny moments, and it occassionally captured my attention. But, excepting those, I can't say it's anything short of a train-wreck.



I've got some sure-to-be good movies (then again, I once had Lola in that group) rented. I finally used my free monthly rental from Blockbuster! Once! So, hopefully, I'll have some more time this week. I kind of doubt it, though. Some Oscar-contending documentaries are playing here tonight through Wednesday night, and I hope to catch one full-length one or a set of three shorts. That will be on a whim though. The film festival starts on the twenty-eigth, and that will bring in a rush of diverse pictures on my plate. In the meanwhile, though, I've got to develop the endurance for a triple-feature on the weekend; Saturday is my only, truly free day.
_________________
Danny Baldwin

View My Reviews
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
Michael Scrutchin
Studio President


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 832
Location: Pearland, TX

PostPosted: 09.14.2004 3:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The past week:



  • Hiroshima mon amour (Resnais, 1959) A-

  • N?i (K?ri, 2003) B+

  • The Girl Next Door (Greenfield, 2004) B+

  • Savage Island (Lando, 2003) B

  • Rosemary's Baby (Polanski, 1968) A



The Girl Next Door is a blast. If not for the likable cast and exuberant direction, though, the hypocrisy and moral confusion of the screenplay probably would have killed it for me. I like the way Charles Taylor of Salon.com caps off his review: "Instead of being about Matthew's coming to the mature conclusion that Danielle could have worked in porn and still be capable of love, The Girl Next Door becomes an adolescent 'redeem a slut' fantasy. It reinforces ancient ideas about what good girls will and won't do. The question the movie doesn't ask is this: Did Matthew think Danielle -- or any of those other girls -- were 'so much better than this' when he was jerking off to them?"



Rosemary's Baby is incredibly frightening. One of the best horror films ever made.



I'll post reviews of N?i and Savage Island on the site within a few weeks.
_________________
Michael Scrutchin
Flipside Movie Emporium
www.flipsidearchive.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 09.14.2004 5:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

beltmann wrote:


Kim?s eloquent and hypnotizing Spring? continues the recent renaissance in South Korean cinema, and I prefer it over even the recent work by Im Kwon-Taek. Although it?s a lofty movie about no less than the acquisition of wisdom over a lifetime, it is stripped of pretension, clutter, and sermonizing. Plus, I?d compare the rich cinematography to that of Tran Anh Hung, another Asian filmmaker infatuated with the gifts of color photography?both directors provide highs of pure, sensational cinema that commercial blockbusters can only fantasize about.




Is this by The Isle's director? If it is, I'm eager to see it. Based on the controversy surrounding it, I expected The Isle to be a sort of arty gore-fest. But it's the exact opposite; it's very quiet and thoughtful, and the queazy moments are suggested more than graphically displayed while the (obscure and ambiguous) symbolism of the acts blunt their sadomasochistic nature further. (Not that I have anything against graphic violence or sadomasochism in cinema, I'm just pointing out that this movie is only either superficially.) I'm not sure how I felt about the bird in the cage being genuinely dumped in a lake, but I reassure myself that the crew rescued it before it came to harm.
_________________
"If you're talking about censorship, and what things should be shown and what things shouldn't be shown, I've said that as an artist you have no social responsibility whatsoever."

-David Cronenberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 09.14.2004 8:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the night watchman wrote:
beltmann wrote:


Kim?s eloquent and hypnotizing Spring? continues the recent renaissance in South Korean cinema, and I prefer it over even the recent work by Im Kwon-Taek. Although it?s a lofty movie about no less than the acquisition of wisdom over a lifetime, it is stripped of pretension, clutter, and sermonizing. Plus, I?d compare the rich cinematography to that of Tran Anh Hung, another Asian filmmaker infatuated with the gifts of color photography?both directors provide highs of pure, sensational cinema that commercial blockbusters can only fantasize about.




Is this by The Isle's director? If it is, I'm eager to see it.


It is. I haven't seen The Isle yet, but I've been meaning to (it's been in my Netflix queue for months). Your post has rekindled my curiosity. I'll try to check it out soon, and you ought to do the same for Spring.... Although I can't say how it compares to The Isle, I can say it's one of the better films I've seen so far this year.



Eric
_________________
"When I was in Barcelona they showed pornography on regular television. I'm assuming it's the same way in Mexico since they also speak Spanish." - IMDb user comment
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Display posts from previous:   
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Flipside Movie Emporium Forum Index -> Movie Talk All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 61, 62, 63 ... 72, 73, 74  Next
Page 62 of 74

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001-2007 phpBB Group