Flipside Movie Emporium Forum Index Flipside Movie Emporium
Discussion Forums Locked & Archived for Browsing
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

What did you watch this week?
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... , 72, 73, 74  Next
 
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Flipside Movie Emporium Forum Index -> Movie Talk
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Michael Scrutchin
Studio President


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 832
Location: Pearland, TX

PostPosted: 12.21.2004 11:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is my catch-up post. Selected viewings since November 1:



Very Good/Great
  • Before Sunset (Linklater, 2004)

  • Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Gondry, 2004)

  • Out of the Past (Tourneur, 1943)

  • A Tale of Two Sisters (Kim, 2003)

  • Twentynine Palms (Dumont, 2003)

  • Undertow (Green, 2004)



Good
  • Coffee and Cigarettes (Jarmusch, 2003)

  • Control Room (Noujaim, 2004)

  • The Dead Zone (Cronenberg, 1983)

  • Dogville (Von Trier, 2003)

  • The Dreamers (Burtolucci, 2003)

  • Fahrenheit 9/11 (Moore, 2004)

  • The Leopard Man (Tourneur, 1943)

  • Mad Love (Freund, 1935)

  • The Passion of the Christ (Gibson, 2004)

  • The Saddest Music in the World (Maddin, 2004)

  • Saved! (Dannelly, 2004)

  • Spartan (Mamet, 2004)

  • Touching the Void (Macdonald, 2003)

  • The Witch Who Came from the Sea (Cimber, 1976)



Okay
  • The Beast with Five Fingers (Florey, 1946)

  • High Noon (Zinnemann, 1952)

  • Super Size Me (Spurlock, 2004)

  • Uzumaki (Higuchinsky, 2000)



I posted some brief thoughts on Twentynine Palms in the What is the most disturbing movie you've ever seen? thread, and I'm currently whipping up a review of the forgotten '70s oddity The Witch Who Came from the Sea (new to DVD), which is way better than I expected.
_________________
Michael Scrutchin
Flipside Movie Emporium
www.flipsidearchive.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Michael Scrutchin
Studio President


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 832
Location: Pearland, TX

PostPosted: 12.21.2004 11:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh, and has anyone else here seen A Tale of Two Sisters? Thoughts?
_________________
Michael Scrutchin
Flipside Movie Emporium
www.flipsidearchive.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 12.21.2004 11:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

matt header wrote:
Maria was really intriguing for about 45 minutes or so and then got bogged down, in my view, by a straightforward desire to wrap up the story; we leave the confines of Maria's mind, which is a fascinating, exciting place to be.


I agree about this, too. Although I admired a great deal about Maria Full of Grace, I was dismayed by how Marston's direct style never found a way to dramatize her psychological desperation--in fact, Maria often comes off as a whiny, door-slamming, woe-is-me teenager. Even once they arrived in the USA, I still felt like I was watching a glorified game of dress-up.



Eric
_________________
"When I was in Barcelona they showed pornography on regular television. I'm assuming it's the same way in Mexico since they also speak Spanish." - IMDb user comment
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 12.23.2004 2:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michael B. Scrutchin wrote:


  • A Tale of Two Sisters (Kim, 2003)

  • Twentynine Palms (Dumont, 2003)




I want to see both of these; I'll probably buy Two Sisters sight unseen just because of the good word it's received, but my local video rental dive says Twentynine Palms is too racy for them to carry. Mad Netflix is looking better and better. I look forward to your review, Michael.



Michael B. Scrutchin wrote:


  • The Leopard Man (Tourneur, 1943)

  • The Saddest Music in the World (Maddin, 2004)

  • The Beast with Five Fingers (Florey, 1946)




The Leopard Man is nicely atmospheric and suspenseful, all the way up to its arbitrary climax. ("What? We need to end the movie now? Hmm. Okay. It was this guy." Rolling Eyes ) Still, worth seeing for the good parts.



Saddest Music was great. It took me about fifteen minutes to get into sync with it (no pun), but then I had a ball. For some reason the sloshing sound Rossellini's beer-filled glass legs makes as she walks around struck me as endlessly hilarious. David Fox is notable for the genuine pathos he evokes in a role (and a story) that is utterly absurd and melodramatic.



On the other hand (no pun), I thought Beast with Five Fingers was illogical, unfair, unfunny, and just lame. I'd rank it with Browning's Mark of the Vampire for its sheer level of annoyance.
_________________
"If you're talking about censorship, and what things should be shown and what things shouldn't be shown, I've said that as an artist you have no social responsibility whatsoever."

-David Cronenberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 12.27.2004 4:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

12/20 ? 12/26/04



A Very Long Engagement (Jeunet, France 2004)

The Aviator (Scorsese, USA 2004)



Both pictures are most notable for their visual invention, but I much preferred The Aviator, which I think is Scorsese?s strongest, most accomplished entertainment since Goodfellas. It?s a full-bodied work, brimming with great performances and an amusing understanding of Hollywood history. (I especially dug how each era in Hughes? life is shot using the same color ?stock? that would have been in vogue at each particular time.) Jeunet offers some gripping visions of war, but overall I found the central investigation less than compelling and the emotional payoff less than satisfying.



Eric
_________________
"When I was in Barcelona they showed pornography on regular television. I'm assuming it's the same way in Mexico since they also speak Spanish." - IMDb user comment
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Danny Baldwin
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 1354
Location: San Diego, CA

PostPosted: 12.27.2004 6:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

beltmann wrote:
Both pictures are most notable for their visual invention, but I much preferred The Aviator, which I think is Scorsese?s strongest, most accomplished entertainment since Goodfellas.


I envy the fact that you were even able to see it. I arrived at the theatre a half an hour early today and it was already sold out. I bought a ticket for Meet the Fockers, but my dad couldn't handle the second row, so we finally decided on Closer. I disliked it immensely and couldn't help but occassionally think about the rave over Scorsese's movie, while watching.
_________________
Danny Baldwin

View My Reviews
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 12.27.2004 3:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Danny Baldwin wrote:
I envy the fact that you were even able to see it. I arrived at the theatre a half an hour early today and it was already sold out.


There's always a logjam at the multiplex throughout Christmas weekend. I saw both movies consecutively with fellow Flipsider mfritschel, and we had the good sense of buying our Aviator tickets in advance, since we were coming straight from a different theater and the timing was going to be tight. We arrived about 30 minutes early and still managed to get decent seats. However, when I ran out to buy a hot dog--no other time for lunch--the theater lobby had become a madhouse. There were two lines forming outside the auditoriums for FOCKERS and NEVERLAND, while a second FOCKERS was just letting out. The entire lobby, which is rather cavernous to begin with, came to a bottle-necked standstill! The most amusing part was the theater manager screeching, "People! This is a fire hazard! This is a fire hazard!!"



I liked Closer.



Eric
_________________
"When I was in Barcelona they showed pornography on regular television. I'm assuming it's the same way in Mexico since they also speak Spanish." - IMDb user comment
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
juhsstin
Camera Operator


Joined: 07 Jul 2003
Posts: 87

PostPosted: 12.27.2004 6:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I saw Darkness over the weekend... don't even waste your time with that one. Evil or Very Mad
_________________
Who let the dogs out?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 12.27.2004 7:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jim Harper wrote:
I do intended to keep a 'film diary' starting from Christmas and I'll try to transfer it to the board once in a while.




Can't wait. Very Happy
_________________
"If you're talking about censorship, and what things should be shown and what things shouldn't be shown, I've said that as an artist you have no social responsibility whatsoever."

-David Cronenberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Danny Baldwin
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 1354
Location: San Diego, CA

PostPosted: 12.28.2004 5:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

12/21 - 12/27



In preferential order.




Gremlins (Dante, 1984)

A Christmas Story (Clark, 1983)

The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou (Anderson, 2004)

Flight of the Phoenix (Moore, 2004)

Closer (Nichols, 2004)

Gremlins 2 (Dante, 1990)

Anacondas (Little, 2004)

Yu-Gi-Oh: The Movie (Tsuji, 2004)



Quite a few Christmas movies this week; I felt like getting in the mood for the holiday, being the scrooge I am. Gremlins was one of the most hysterical movies I've seen in quite some time, while its sequel leaves much to be desired. A Christmas Story certainly isn't the great movie that everybody makes it out to be, but it's sweet, I guess.



Wes Anderson's The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou feels as though it was made from a story-board, with underdeveloped ideas and a bunch of unecessary filler, but I found its rediculous, deadpan style to be amusing, not to mention that the entire cast is a hoot.



Closer is the only movie I disliked that's really worth getting riled up about. It represents an interesting scenario--with the failure of one of its parts comes the breakdown of the entire movie. Just as a perfect car won't accelerate without gas, Nichols' film stalls because of the awful dialogue. Sure, it has a rat-tat-tat ring to it, as Beltmann mentioned, but I can't help but feel that it is so stupid. No matter how talented the actors are, no matter how provocative the director's style is, the movie is laughable because it sacrifices emotion for a clever ring. It's the kind of thing that would work in a book, where the entire story can be imagined, but when actual people are reciting the lines, it feels far too contrived to even become involed in. I didn't want to understand the characters, not because their behavior was so dispicable, but because the dumbness of the movie made any attention I wanted to direct towards it unworthy. Natalie Portman and Jude Law have confirmed that they can act, but for what?
_________________
Danny Baldwin

View My Reviews
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
Jim Harper
Director


Joined: 29 Feb 2004
Posts: 226
Location: Totnes, Devon, UK

PostPosted: 12.28.2004 6:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michael B. Scrutchin wrote:
Oh, and has anyone else here seen A Tale of Two Sisters? Thoughts?




I saw it when it was first made available on a cheap HK disc. Excellent film. Had to watch it three times to pick up all the threads, but it's a genuinely creepy little gem. Definitely the best Korean horror film I've ever seen, and one of the best horrors of recent years.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail MSN Messenger
Jim Harper
Director


Joined: 29 Feb 2004
Posts: 226
Location: Totnes, Devon, UK

PostPosted: 12.28.2004 6:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Received a stack of DVDs for Crhistmas, and I've been slowing plowing through them. Here's the lineup so far:



25/12/04



The Devil Rides Out (dir. Terence Fisher, 1968)

The Nameless (dir. Jaume Balaguero, 1999)

The House That Dripped Blood (dir. Peter Duffell, 1970)



26/12/04



Blood From the Mummy?s Tomb (dir. Seth Holt, 1971)

The Toolbox Murders (dir. Tobe Hooper, 2003)



27/12/04



Dr. Who and the Daleks (dir. Gordon Flemyng, 1965)

Inseminoid (dir. Norman J Warren, 1981)

Godsend (dir. Nick Hamm, 2004)



28/12/04



The Face of Fu Manchu (dir. Don Sharp, 1965)



The big surprise was The Toolbox Murders. A dumb slasher movie to be sure, but easily the best thing Hooper has done in twenty years. Surprisingly entertaining.



The Devil Rides Out and Blood From the Mummy's Tomb are old favourites and a couple of Hammer's best later-period films.



The Nameless annoyed the crap out of me. I was really looking forward to it in the hope of finding some new talented young horror director, but it's pretty much a garbled piece of crap. It looks great, but I'd have a hard time telling you what it's actually about.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail MSN Messenger
Jim Harper
Director


Joined: 29 Feb 2004
Posts: 226
Location: Totnes, Devon, UK

PostPosted: 01.02.2005 2:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

29/12/04

The Brides of Fu Manchu (dir. Don Sharp, 1966)

Open Water (dir. Chris Kentis, 2004)*

Cypher (dir. Vincenzo Natali, 2002)*

Hands of the Ripper (dir. Peter Sasdy, 1971)*



30/12/04

Chronicles of Riddick (dir. David Twohy, 2004)*



31/12/04

I, Robot (dir. Alex Proyas, 2004)*

Night of the Big Heat (dir. Terence Fisher, 1967)*



01/01/05

Ju-rei: The Uncanny (dir. Koji Shiraishi, 2004)*

The Time Machine (dir. George Pal, 1960)*

Garfield (dir. Peter Hewitt, 2004)*

Lust For A Vampire (dir. Jimmy Sangster, 1971)*

The Beast Must Die (dir. Paul Annett, 1974)



Highlights this week were Open Water, Cypher and Chronicles of Riddick. I thought it was a little misleading to bill Open Water as a horror film, but the film itself was pretty good with a surprisingly downbeat ending. Cypher was a pleasant surprise, especially given that I was in two minds whether to watch it. I hope the rest of Natali's work lives up to the standards of this and Cube.



Miserable failures: Ju-rei, a deeply uninspiring Juon ripoff with no redeeming features and Lust For A Vampire, one of the worst Hammer films I've seen in ages, which is unfortunate, because it came in a set with Scars of Dracula and Horror of Frankenstein, two other deeply disappointing offerings from Hammer.



Honorable mention: Night of the Big Heat, which wasn't quite as brilliant as the Quatermass films, but an entertaining slice of late-period British sci-fi nonetheless.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail MSN Messenger
the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 01.02.2005 6:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jim Harper wrote:
The Nameless annoyed the crap out of me. I was really looking forward to it in the hope of finding some new talented young horror director, but it's pretty much a garbled piece of crap. It looks great, but I'd have a hard time telling you what it's actually about.




That's disappointing to hear. As a big Ramsey Campbell fan, I've been waiting years for this, the first movie based on any of his work, to be released in the US. On the other hand, yours is the first solidly negative reaction to it I've heard. I wouldn't mind reading a longer review, maybe for Flipside?



Jim Harper wrote:
Ju-rei, a deeply uninspiring Juon ripoff with no redeeming features.




This was just released in the US, and I've been hesitant to pick it up; glad I didn't waste my time.
_________________
"If you're talking about censorship, and what things should be shown and what things shouldn't be shown, I've said that as an artist you have no social responsibility whatsoever."

-David Cronenberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 01.02.2005 7:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[moved to other thread]
_________________
"When I was in Barcelona they showed pornography on regular television. I'm assuming it's the same way in Mexico since they also speak Spanish." - IMDb user comment


Last edited by beltmann on 01.02.2005 7:30 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Display posts from previous:   
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Flipside Movie Emporium Forum Index -> Movie Talk All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... , 72, 73, 74  Next
Page 73 of 74

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001-2007 phpBB Group