Flipside Movie Emporium Forum Index Flipside Movie Emporium
Discussion Forums Locked & Archived for Browsing
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Screening Log 2006 - What did you watch this week?
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, ... 23, 24, 25  Next
 
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Flipside Movie Emporium Forum Index -> Movie Talk
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 01.11.2006 7:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michael B. Scrutchin wrote:


I got Warner's Film Noir and Val Lewton box sets for Christmas. Very Happy




Lucky, lucky dog.
_________________
"If you're talking about censorship, and what things should be shown and what things shouldn't be shown, I've said that as an artist you have no social responsibility whatsoever."

-David Cronenberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Jim Harper
Director


Joined: 29 Feb 2004
Posts: 226
Location: Totnes, Devon, UK

PostPosted: 01.14.2006 6:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michael B. Scrutchin wrote:
I got [the] Val Lewton box set for Christmas. Very Happy




Me too, actually. It was late, only arriving today, but most welcome.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail MSN Messenger
Jim Harper
Director


Joined: 29 Feb 2004
Posts: 226
Location: Totnes, Devon, UK

PostPosted: 01.15.2006 1:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

08/01/06 - 15/01/06

World Apartment Horror (dir. Katsuhiro Otomo, 1991)

Suicide Manual (dir. Osamu Fukutani, 2003)

The Twilight Samurai (dir. Yōji Yamada, 2002)*

The Ring Virus (dir. Kim Dong-bin, 1999)

Jack the Ripper (dir. Jess Franco, 1976)*

Dr Jekyll vs. the Werewolf (dir. Leon Klimovsky, 1972)*

Rasen (dir. Joji Iida, 1999)

The Discarnates (dir. Nobuhiko Obayashi, 1988)

The House with the Laughing Windows (dir. Pupi Avati, 1976)

I?m Not Scared (dir. Gabriele Salvatores, 2003)*

The Lady in White (dir. Frank LaLoggia, 1988)*

Nausicaa of the Valley of the Winds (dir. Hiyao Miyazaki, 1984)*

The Seventh Victim (dir. Mark Robson, 1943)

The Leopard Man (dir. Jacques Tourneur, 1943)*

Ring 2 (dir. Hideo Nakata, 1999)



Not a bad week's viewing. Twilight Samurai was very good indeed. I've resisted watching it for a while now, but when I gave in it was surprisingly entertaining. Jack the Ripper was another surprise; normally I get tired of Franco after about 10 minutes, but I actually enjoyed this one. It's no masterpiece, but Franco manages to actually wheel out some talent (a rare occurence), and Kinski's always fun to watch.



Neither The Leopard Man or The Lady in White were as good as I'd been lead to believe, although they were far from bad. Sadly Dr Jekyll vs. the Werewolf falls solidly into the 'bad' category.



Nausicaa of the Valley of the Winds isn't Miyazaki's best, but even average Miyazaki is considerably more entertaining than most.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail MSN Messenger
mfritschel
Cinematographer


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 143
Location: Port Washington, WI

PostPosted: 01.16.2006 1:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Broken Flowers (Jarmusch, 2005)



The Exorcism of Emily Rose (Derrickson, 2005)



Dark Water (Salles, 2005)



Broken Flowers is by far the best of the group, although it seems to have come out a year too late for we already have a Bill Murray looking for meaning in his life type movie in Lost in Translation. Besides of the comparisons the movie kept brining up in my mind, it was rather entertaining, most notably by having its own sense of entertainment and leaving the viewer never quite sure to expect next. As far as the other two, Exorcism kept me quite enthralled, but seemed to fall short in parts and Dark Water developed a great sense of mood and place with solid performances, but again left me looking for more at the end.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Mark Dujsik
Director


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 212
Location: Chicago, IL

PostPosted: 01.16.2006 1:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Crash (Haggis, 2005)

Good Night, and Good Luck. (Clooney, 2005)

Hostel (Roth, 2006)

Kung Fu Hustle (Chow, 2005)

Reefer Madness (Gasnier, 1936)

The Ringer (Blaustein, 2005)

Tristan & Isolde (Reynolds, 2006)

Wedding Crashers (Dobkin, 2005)



Good week in terms of numbers. Where to start?



The Ringer and Wedding Crashers had me leery with their premises early on, but I ended up liking the former a bit and the latter a little bit. Ringer certainly wins out, as it has a good heart and still is quite funny, while Crashers falls into the trappings of romantic comedy near the end.



Kung Fu Hustle is one of the best times I had watching a 2005 movie.



Crash and Good Night, and Good Luck. are huge critical successes of the year, and I liked but was underwhelmed by both. Crash has a few too many script contrivances and Bendan Fraser and Sandra Bullock's characters are pretty much useless to the story, and Good Night is very lean filmmaking--in a good way. The downside is it overlooks a lot about McCarthyism in the process.



Tristan & Isolde is solid. Working on a review very soon.



Now the two really bad ones. Reefer Madness is hilarious, as if you didn't know. On the other end, I absolutely despised Hostel.
_________________
"Film lovers are sick people."

--Fran?ois Truffaut



10 Best Films of 2006



Mark Reviews Movies


Last edited by Mark Dujsik on 01.16.2006 4:34 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 01.16.2006 4:32 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

1/9 ? 1/15/06



Good week. In preferential order:



Fear and Trembling / Corneau / France / 2003

Walk On Water / Fox / Israel / 2004

The Beat That My Heart Skipped / Audiard / France / 2005

Caf? Lumiere / Hou / Taiwan / 2003

Mean Creek / Estes / USA / 2004

Tropical Malady / Weerasethankul / Thailand / 2004

Gabbeh / Makhmalbaf / Iran / 1996

Trading Places / Landis / USA / 1983

The Devil?s Rejects / Zombie / USA / 2005

A Hole In My Heart / Moodysson / Sweden / 2004



Fear and Trembling is the funniest movie I've seen in six months.



For those interested in Munich, I'd also recommend the Israeli film Walk On Water, which shares with Spielberg's film certain thematic and philosophical qualities. It concerns a young, present-day Mossad agent who hunts down and kills former Nazis. But when he's asked to befriend the grandson of an aging Nazi officer who may or may not still be alive, the agent's nationalistic convictions (and his preconceptions about his duties regarding the past) are challenged. As an artist Fox is the real deal; I'd also highly recommend his earlier Yossi & Jagger, which, in its story of soldiers in love, predates Brokeback Mountain as a gay romance set within a traditionally "macho" genre.



I'm really tired of movies that are enamored with the "exoticism" of the underworld, but The Beat That My Heart Skipped, a French remake of Toback's Fingers, still has considerable merits: Romain Duris (looking like a young Daniel Day-Lewis) capably suggests the internal struggle of a thug trying to balance criminal life with his dream of becoming a concert pianist; his love affair with his best friend's wife has some fire to it; and the tense-funny scenes with a Japanese piano teacher who speaks no French convey the violence of artistic desire. I definitely liked it more than Audiard's earlier Read My Lips.



Mean Creek is a mildly interesting teen drama with a very interesting soundtrack--although I think it's rather unlikely that these particular kids would be listening to Eels, Wilco, and Spoon, among others.



In terms of style and craft, The Devil?s Rejects is a major advance for Rob Zombie?but that doesn?t make it any less reprehensible or boring than House of 1000 Corpses. Zombie does make an interesting choice at the midway point: Having asked us to feel sympathy for a group of travelers cruelly, pointlessly tortured by the ?rejects,? Zombie then turns the tables and asks us to feel the same sympathy for the torturers once they are in a similar position. Still, rather than a ?bold? statement about how the vengeance-seeking sheriff?s hypocrisy is the greatest evil of all, I?d argue that what mostly comes across is Zombie?s tiresome, amoral aesthetic: He?s really just interested in stupid hillbilly jokes and hideous imagery for their own sake.



A Hole In My Heart is quite dreadful, and quite disappointing--it's the first Moodysson film that I haven't loved.



Eric
_________________
"When I was in Barcelona they showed pornography on regular television. I'm assuming it's the same way in Mexico since they also speak Spanish." - IMDb user comment
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Michael Scrutchin
Studio President


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 832
Location: Pearland, TX

PostPosted: 01.16.2006 5:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

beltmann wrote:
A Hole In My Heart is quite dreadful, and quite disappointing--it's the first Moodysson film that I haven't loved.




I'm still not sure what to make of A Hole in My Heart. It was oddly affecting at times, but, dear God, I hope to never watch it again. I mostly agree with you about The Devil's Rejects, but I enjoyed it -- mostly for the style and William Forsythe's performance. If Zombie ever gets his hands on a good screenplay, he could make a damn good movie.
_________________
Michael Scrutchin
Flipside Movie Emporium
www.flipsidearchive.com


Last edited by Michael Scrutchin on 01.16.2006 6:02 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Danny Baldwin
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 1354
Location: San Diego, CA

PostPosted: 01.16.2006 5:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

1/9 - 1/15



Not a single one. When the semester ends, I'll surely be ready to watch a lot of stuff, though.
_________________
Danny Baldwin

View My Reviews
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 01.16.2006 7:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Carlito?s Way: Rise to Power (Michael Scott Bregman, 2005) - Flat, paint-by-numbers gangster movie that does a disservice to the original. It must be said, however, that things pick up when Luis Guzman is on screen. He?s the Christopher Walken of this flick. And, by golly, the gag real is actually funny.



Be Cool (F. Gary Gray, 2005) - Yeah, I laughed. But the movie?s far too self-reflexive to work. In Get Shorty I believed in Chili Palmer. In this one, I only see John Travolta playing Chili Palmer.



Gilda (Charles Vidor, 1946) - Great movie that reminds me of Casablanca with the psychosis of Vertigo. I loved the loaded dialogue in the first third that reveals character and back story while always moving the current story forward. The only flaw is the disappointingly pat ending, which forces the three leads to transform into stock movie characters for the last five minutes. Still, I think this one?s going on my all-time favorites list. Yeah, it?s that good.



I also picked up the three volumes of Lovecraft-based movies from Lurker Films. Here are the most notable that appear on the discs:



the feature presentations



Out of Mind: The Stories of H. P. Lovecraft boasts an interesting premise that manages to loosely adapt a few of Lovecraft?s stories within an original narrative. The whole thing is well-made and well-acted, with an amazing performance by Christopher Heyerdahl as the gentleman from New England himself. It only stumbles at the end, when it simply seems to come to a hault rather than provide an actual ending. Still, a must for admirers of HPL.



Cool Air is a very good adaptation and expansion of its source. Jack Donner?s performance as the strange recluse with the weird machine in the upper story of a boarding house is remarkably fully-fleshed out and well rounded. Stumbles occasionally, but is still quite good.



Rough Magick is a pilot for a series that the BBC decided not to pick up. No wonder, its production values are about as good as a Doctor Who episode from the 80s, the first third is made up almost exclusively of expository dialogue, and the cast over-acts shamelessly through the whole affair. The premise is based on the Delta Green expansion rules for the Call of Cthulhu RPG, which I?ve never played but strikes me as the Cthulhu Mythos as written by Tom Clancy. Never thought it was a terribly good idea in the first place.



shorts



Nyarlathotep faithfully adapts the prose poem, and though it has many of the faults you?d expect from an amateur film, it's still pretty good and worth watching anyway. I would have preferred if they?d kept the narration (a word-for-word reading of the text itself) off the soundtrack and focused on a purely visual telling.



An Imperfect Solution, a loose adaptation of the middle chapters of ?Herbert West--Reanimator,? takes itself too seriously to be much fun.



The Terrible Old Man is actually a good idea, done poorly. A modern-day update of the story, a trio of post-Tarrantino criminals on the lamb* decides to rob the wrong old guy?s house. Could have worked beautifully, but the dialogue is unwieldy and the cast delivers it awkwardly. The work by the DP, on the other hand, looks remarkably slick and professional.



* EDIT: Not to give the wrong idea of the movie, the criminals were actually on the lam, not the lamb. Of course, that might have added the extra edge the movie needed.
_________________
"If you're talking about censorship, and what things should be shown and what things shouldn't be shown, I've said that as an artist you have no social responsibility whatsoever."

-David Cronenberg


Last edited by the night watchman on 01.17.2006 1:21 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 01.16.2006 10:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the night watchman wrote:
Gilda... Yeah, it?s that good.


Seconded.
_________________
"When I was in Barcelona they showed pornography on regular television. I'm assuming it's the same way in Mexico since they also speak Spanish." - IMDb user comment
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 01.17.2006 7:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

beltmann wrote:


In terms of style and craft, The Devil?s Rejects is a major advance for Rob Zombie?but that doesn?t make it any less reprehensible or boring than House of 1000 Corpses. Zombie does make an interesting choice at the midway point: Having asked us to feel sympathy for a group of travelers cruelly, pointlessly tortured by the ?rejects,? Zombie then turns the tables and asks us to feel the same sympathy for the torturers once they are in a similar position. Still, rather than a ?bold? statement about how the vengeance-seeking sheriff?s hypocrisy is the greatest evil of all, I?d argue that what mostly comes across is Zombie?s tiresome, amoral aesthetic: He?s really just interested in stupid hillbilly jokes and hideous imagery for their own sake.




I suppose I watched it as an attempt--a successful one, in my opinion--to turn the heroic figure of the 70's drop-out/hippy-outlaw on its head. I think it also, like TCM, observes nihilism, rather than embrasses it. That said, I could have done without about half of the stupid hillbilly jokes. (C'mon, some of it was funny.)
_________________
"If you're talking about censorship, and what things should be shown and what things shouldn't be shown, I've said that as an artist you have no social responsibility whatsoever."

-David Cronenberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 01.17.2006 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the night watchman wrote:
I suppose I watched it as an attempt--a successful one, in my opinion--to turn the heroic figure of the 70's drop-out/hippy-outlaw on its head.


I honestly tried to approach it on that level--and the '70's visual style is a genuine merit--but for me, such an attempt is overwhelmed by Zombie's prevailing fascination with the coarse and the grotesque. Thematically I have no problem with that, except that his fascination never goes beyond the childish; we're meant to share Zombie's view that these images and sounds are really, really awesome.



Quote:
I think it also, like TCM, observes nihilism, rather than embrasses it.


Besides the objection that merely observing nihilism is rarely valuable enough to justify introducing such ugliness into the atmosphere, I disagree: I definitely felt that Zombie embraces these characters and their attitudes. The final sequence, especially, with the choices of slo-mo and music suggest a clear loyalty to the title figures. In fact, Zombie's decision to ask viewers to identify with, relate to, sympathize with, and (here's the rub) celebrate these characters is precisely what many critics found "daring." Perhaps that is indeed "daring," but I don't agree that's automatically a virtue. (I know I'm objecting to this movie on moral rather than objective grounds, but I think that's perfectly reasonable--one of the reasons art matters is because it possesses ethical dimensions that, in my opinion, are too frequently marginalized.)



Essentially I agree with your larger point, though: If I honestly felt that The Devil's Rejects had something useful to observe or say about such people, that would go a long way in helping me forgive its vile imagery. Rather than being objective or ambivalent about the cruelty on display, though, I'd argue that the movie does indeed promote a specific point-of-view--it feels like a repulsive vision of how one man thinks general nihilism is just the coolest.



Another observation (but not a criticism): The movie is gross, to be sure, but nothing in the movie is remotely frightening or suspenseful.



Eric
_________________
"When I was in Barcelona they showed pornography on regular television. I'm assuming it's the same way in Mexico since they also speak Spanish." - IMDb user comment
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
the night watchman
Studio Exec


Joined: 27 Jun 2003
Posts: 1373
Location: Dark, run-down shack by the graveyard.

PostPosted: 01.18.2006 12:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

beltmann wrote:
Zombie's prevailing fascination with the coarse and the grotesque [...] Zombie's view that these images and sounds are really, really awesome [...]it feels like a repulsive vision of how one man thinks general nihilism is just the coolest.




Tidying things up would have made this movie "more mature?" I don't agree. I also don't agree that in refusing to tip its hat to "good behavior" a narrative necessarily condones or admires "bad behavior," even if, as in the case of The Devil's Rejects, it does seem to perceive or understand the allure.



beltmann wrote:


merely observing nihilism is rarely valuable enough to justify introducing such ugliness into the atmosphere




That's a pretty loaded comment. Here's another one: Art that is worthwhile reminds us of our humanity. Art that uses the theme of nihilism as its subject, I've found, tends to make the viewer want to more, not less, actively embrace his humanity. I don't mean to defend Devil's Rejects as great art, or even worthwhile art, but you seemed to be making some generalized observations here. In any case, at its very least, Zombie's movie doesn't strike me as being stuck in the ethical or philosophical morass you find it.



beltmann wrote:
I definitely felt that Zombie embraces these characters and their attitudes. The final sequence, especially, with the choices of slo-mo and music suggest a clear loyalty to the title figures.




Personally, I wasn't able to view the apparent heroism bestowed upon the characters in final sequence as anything but an ironic counterpoint to the scenes earlier on in which they terrorize and murder innocent victims. Otis, Baby, and Spaulding may view themselves as outlaw heroes (may even see themselves as they are portrayed in the wildly incongruent "happy and peaceful" flashbacks the movie cuts to just before the finale), but I don't think the movie sees them in this light--especially if it's watched Bonnie and Clyde.



beltmann wrote:
In fact, Zombie's decision to ask viewers to identify with, relate to, sympathize with, and (here's the rub) celebrate these characters is precisely what many critics found "daring." Perhaps that is indeed "daring," but I don't agree that's automatically a virtue.




I didn't read reviews by those critics, but if that's their interpretation of the movie, then I don't agree with it.



beltmann wrote:
I know I'm objecting to this movie on moral rather than objective grounds, but I think that's perfectly reasonable--one of the reasons art matters is because it possesses ethical dimensions that, in my opinion, are too frequently marginalized.




I don't necessarily see it that way, although in most big-budget studio movies the ethics on display are often as challenging as the color beige.
_________________
"If you're talking about censorship, and what things should be shown and what things shouldn't be shown, I've said that as an artist you have no social responsibility whatsoever."

-David Cronenberg
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 01.18.2006 1:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

the night watchman wrote:
That's a pretty loaded comment... you seemed to be making some generalized observations here.


Granted. I was indeed speaking in subjective general terms, and concede many exceptions. I thought that would be clear.



the night watchman wrote:
Personally, I wasn't able to view the apparent heroism bestowed upon the characters in final sequence as anything but an ironic counterpoint to the scenes earlier on in which they terrorize and murder innocent victims.


As I said earlier, this counterpoint is perhaps what I found most interesting about the story, but in my eyes it remains Zombie's secondary interest and conspicuously undeveloped; in my view, his infatuation with grotesquery as a cool quotient more or less neutralizes any rationalizations for Zombie's apparent irony.



the night watchman wrote:
Art that uses the theme of nihilism as its subject, I've found, tends to make the viewer want to more, not less, actively embrace his humanity


As you know, on a theoretical level I agree, and Oldboy comes to mind as a recent example that works this way for me. However, I've now experienced two Rob Zombie movies that have had the reverse effect on me, and made me feel less like a member of the human race. I find them deeply dispiriting. If our responses are different, I'd argue that's merely proof for why artistic freedom is necessary; one man's poison is another man's tonic, and vice versa.



the night watchman wrote:
Tidying things up would have made this movie "more mature?" I also don't agree that in refusing to tip its hat to "good behavior" a narrative necessarily condones or admires "bad behavior"


I think you already know that I'm not asking for a "tidying up," and I don't think I implied that a refusal to kowtow to conventional morality automatically translates into an admiration of misbehavior. My point is that, to my eyes, Zombie does not merely perceive the allure of evil; he very clearly tips his hat to it--indulges it, even--and then does very little else that is noteworthy. Mostly, I think we disagree about which tone ultimately prevails in this movie, which perhaps signals why we agree on general theoretical grounds but disagree about whether they specifically apply to The Devil's Rejects.



the night watchman wrote:
I don't necessarily see it that way, although in most big-budget studio movies the ethics on display are often as challenging as the color beige.


This goes without saying, doesn't it? Still, I think we can both agree that Warner Brothers' Bonnie & Clyde evokes with far more skill the complicated ironies being ascribed to The Devil's Rejects.



Eric
_________________
"When I was in Barcelona they showed pornography on regular television. I'm assuming it's the same way in Mexico since they also speak Spanish." - IMDb user comment
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
beltmann
Studio Exec


Joined: 26 Jun 2003
Posts: 2341
Location: West Bend, WI

PostPosted: 01.18.2006 2:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

the night watchman wrote:
That said, I could have done without about half of the stupid hillbilly jokes. (C'mon, some of it was funny.)


Yeah, maybe. Razz
_________________
"When I was in Barcelona they showed pornography on regular television. I'm assuming it's the same way in Mexico since they also speak Spanish." - IMDb user comment
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message AIM Address
Display posts from previous:   
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    Flipside Movie Emporium Forum Index -> Movie Talk All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, ... 23, 24, 25  Next
Page 2 of 25

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001-2007 phpBB Group